Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

Answer: a mind (and toe, and finger, and just general body) numbing -100°C (or -148°F!). Where is this place, and what does it mean to you? Well, the coldest place on Earth is known as “Dome A,” or “Dome Argus,” and is located in the middle of Antarctica. It is known as the summit of the “East Antarctic Ice Cap,” which is in essence a large “mountain” of ice in Antarctica. What this means to you is that you would probably freeze to death in seconds if you went there unprotected (never mind the elevation and oxygen issues).

What is interesting to note is that dry ice (frozen Carbon Dioxide) is generally kept at around –78.5°C (or -109°F). This means that if you brought a block of dry ice to Dome A, it would actually get colder. We sure do live on a crazy planet!

To check out some substances that are actually hundreds of degrees colder than Dome A (or dry ice), check out the new Orlando Science Center show Sub-Zero, playing every Saturday in July.

 

Dome_A


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To prepare liquid nitrogen through the process of liquidation, molecular energy from Nitrogen is removed. So the liquid has little to no energy and is also a freezing temperature. When the liquid is exposed to regular conditions, the molecules inside the liquid start absorbing the heat energy from its surroundings causing it to boil. Liquid nitrogen even boils at temperatures below zero!!

For more interesting facts and experiments with liquid nitrogen, come and check out Sub-Zero beginning July 3rd and only offered on Saturdays throughout the summer!!

 

OSC_Sub_Zero_Host_012_Web


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It’s a great time for paleontology. I know, I’m the first guy to say “It’s always a great time for paleontology” but believe me, this time, it’s a great time for Paleontology!

In the last few weeks, we’ve made incredible leaps and bounds in our understanding of the natural world. Scientists in Canada, Australia, and Japan successfully cloned blood protein from a Siberian Wooly Mammoth, bringing us one step closer to successfully cloning an extinct animal (The Pyrenean Ibex, an extinct goat, was cloned in 2009, but did not survive.) Scientists are optimistic, some predicting oogenesis (living embryos) in the next two years, and giant fuzzy elephants in zoos in less than five years!

This article is really about Snuffy and Big Bird, if you think about it.

I know, right? But sit down, there’s more.

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STAN the T. rex is a truly spectacular display that you can only see in DinoDigs... Or Indianapolis... Or London... Or California... Or Arizona... Or Japan.

What gives? How can the same dinosaur be in so many places at once?

(Originally posted June 6, 2009) - Dinosaur fossils are fragile pieces of the puzzle of Earth's history. When we do find them (and it is tough - even if you know where to look) they are often broken up or missing pieces. Even STAN was missing about 30% of his skeleton when he was discovered. How do scientists bring them back for us to view in museums around the world?

We make copies! (or Casts, as we call them!) It's okay, because if scientists didn't do that, the whole world would only have about 3 or 4 complete T. rex skeletons altogether (and a ton of spare parts!)

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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
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