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Kind words from our friends in St. Cloud.  It's always nice to hear we're making an impact!

"On behalf of the St. Cloud High School Health Science Department I want to extend our thanks for including our program in the Regional Nursing Career Pathway Initiative. Your presenters were fabulous and the curriculum exciting!"


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Here at the Science Center, we have baby alligators that are about two to three years old. In one lifetime, they’ll go through about 2,000-3,000 teeth because of the constant wear down they experience. In the wild, they eat fish, small mammals, birds, and other reptiles. We feed them a diet of chicken and reptile pellets, but we’d like to remind our guests to not feed alligators in the wild.

Naturally timid of humans, alligators begin to associate food with people once they get into the habit of being fed. It’s very dangerous and leads to an increase of alligator attacks. Visit NatureWorks to feed our gators without the worry!


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Being a carnivorous animal, an Eastern Indigo Snake’s diet consists of turtles, fish, birds, small alligators and other snakes, venomous and non-venomous. Primiarily found in Central and South Florida, Eastern Indigo Snakes frequent flatwoods, dry glades and sandy soils. Humans are the biggest known threat to these snakes because of highway fatalities, pet trade and habitat destruction. These creatures are enlisted as an endangered species and if you happen to see one in your yard, please contact the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission 1-888-404-3922.

Indigo_Snake


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Energy saving light bulbs are more than just a popular trend, they’re literally a ‘light saver.’ Although they cost about $5 more than the average bulb, they save approximately $30 or more per household during its lifetime by using 16 watts instead of 60 watts of energy. Using fewer watts, energy saving light bulbs generate less heat and allow homes to remain cooler. They’re proven to be 80% more efficient compared to a regular light bulb, so it’s no wonder that people are switching to a brighter solution.

 

Light_Bulb


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Over 500 cavemen and cavewomen stepped into the past on November 6 for Orlando Science Center’s fourth annual Neanderthal Ball. Guests arrived in style by showcasing their favorite animal print cocktail dresses, ties and prehistoric accessories. DinoDigs set the stage, providing attendees with the opportunity to dine beside STAN the T-Rex and slightly friendlier dinosaurs.

Capital Grille, Tim’s Wine Market and Orlando Brewing helped kick off the festivities by providing fine wine and delicious beer that flowed freely throughout the gala evening. The silent auction was the talk of the party, as some of Orlando’s most influential people traveled around the fourth floor rotunda bidding on items that were graciously donated by an array of spectacular sponsors. Exclusive travel packages, theme park attractions, wine and dining events, sports and golf outings and gift certificates were just some of the unique experiences and items offered.

The celebration continued throughout the night as our ancient friends enjoyed their meals, while rocking out to music and themed entertainment. Chief Meteorologist Jeff Day led the raffle drawings that included two round-trip Air Tran tickets, a Chauffered Dine-Around, as well as the best prize of the night, a half-carat diamond!

Due in part to this extraordinary fundraiser, dedicated Board of Trustees and devoted staff, the Orlando Science Center is able to maintain the mission and goal of inspiring science learning for life.

 


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Composting is an easy way to reduce waste and it also benefits plants and soil. According to StopWaste.org, you need an equal proportion of browns, greens, air and water to make compost. Browns are dry, woody materials (leaves, shrub clippings, pine needles, newspaper, etc.) while greens are moist, nitrogen-fied materials (fruit and vegetable peelings, grass clippings, weeds, and the like). Mix the browns and greens equally and make sure the compost is kept as moist as a wrung-out sponge. Once your mixture has a nice, earthy smell and appears like coffee grounds, it’s ready to be used!


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From 1975 to 1995 Florida was amongst the only four states that did not have any earthquakes; however, our state has not escaped all seismic shocks. For instance, in 1866, an earthquake in Charleston, South Carolina (two states away!) sent shocks throughout northern Florida and along its east coast. Of course this is nothing compared to the near 10,000 earthquakes of varying magnitudes occuring EACH year in southern California – luckily our state is not located on any hazardous faults or fault zones! If you want to see earthquakes and other forces of nature in action, check out the newest giant screen film playing at the Dr. Phillips CineDome, Forces of Nature.


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Orlando Science Center • 777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Supported by the City of Orlando, Orange County, and United Arts of Central Florida with funds from the United Arts campaign and the State of Florida,
Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Privacy Policy