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Over 5,000 Pack Science Center for Walmart $5 Day

On August 28, the Walmart Foundation sponsored a $5 admission day for the Orlando Science Center, which offered all exhibits, films and live programs to guests for the significantly discounted price of $5. More than 5,000 guests packed the Science Center to enjoy exhibits like GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked the World, DinoDigs, NatureWorks, and Science Park.

Guests of all ages explored the science of sound, checked out live swamp critters, unearthed prehistoric mysteries, confronted the wild winds of a hurricane and raced on one of the largest Pinewood Derby tracks you’ve ever seen. Guests also saw all the films showing that day on the giant screen of the Dr. Phillips CineDome, including the exotic landscape of Arabia or the hilarious creatures of Animalopolis. Plus, they were shocked by the electric performance of our newest live show – High Voltage.


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Sunday, August 28, 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.


ORLANDO, FL - (August 28, 2011) – The Walmart Foundation and the Orlando Science Center will host “Walmart $5 Day” at the Orlando Science Center on Sunday, August 28. All guests will enjoy everything that the Science Center has to offer for the significantly discounted price of $5. General admission fees are usually $17 for adults and $12 for kids (ages 3-11). For many, this event provides the opportunity to experience the Science Center for the first time.

“Walmart and the Walmart Foundation are dedicated to making an impact in communities where our employees and customers live and work,” said Walmart Market Manager for Central Florida, Rick Tomb. “We are very proud of programs like Walmart $5 Day because we immediately see the result on the faces of the visitors to the Orlando Science Center.”

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More than 1,500 Running to Support the Orlando Science Center

August 13, 2011

Saturday, August 13 kicked off Track Shack’s annual Grand Prix series with the Celebration of Running 5K at the Orlando Science Center in Loch Haven Park. What you may not know is proceeds from this event benefit the Orlando Science Center and help us promote science education and provide engaging experiences for all ages in the community.

More than 1,500 runners and walkers enjoyed the scenic route through the lovely neighborhoods surrounding Loch Haven Park. Proceeds benefit the Orlando Science Center through the Track Shack Foundation and will be used to promote science education and provide engaging experiences for all ages in the community.

Presented by Florida Hospital and the Track Shack Foundation, the Annual Celebration of Running 5K is the launch of a month long celebration (and sale) at the Track Shack, which commemorates 33 years of business, and kicks off the famous Grand Prix series of races.


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Beat Feet to Support the Orlando Science Center

Saturday, August 13, 2011, Race Starts at 7:30 a.m. at the Science Center

WHAT: It’s a running celebration! Presented by Florida Hospital and the Track Shack Foundation, the 20th Annual Celebration of Running 5K will be held at the Orlando Science Center in Loch Haven Park on August 13, 2011.

This 20th Annual event kicks off the 34th Track Shack Running Series. This is just the first of seven premier Orlando road races and it is part of a month long celebration at the Track Shack, which commemorates the store’s more than three decades in this community. This first race of the season supports the Orlando Science Center and its mission of “inspiring science learning for life.”

Runners and Walkers of all ages and all fitness levels are invited to compete along the 3.1-mile course located throughout quaint neighborhoods on the outskirts of downtown Orlando.  Paid entrants will receive a tech T-shirt, ice-cold refreshments, Florida Hospital’s interactive health screenings and special prizes awarded to significant finishers at the end of the race.

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If “Shark Week” has made you fearful of jumping into the ocean, you might want to consider the dangers of tromping through American wetlands. Over the past decade, more people perished at the mouths of alligators than those of sharks in this country. Nine people have died from U.S. – based shark attacks, while 13 were mortal victims of alligator attacks.

Meanwhile, American crocodiles have never killed or even bitten anyone in their native Florida, but they certainly have the chops to do it. Three decades ago, their numbers had dwindled to about 300. Thanks to conservation efforts, they’ve moved off the Endangered Species list and now boast a current population close to 1,800.

In Florida, better enforcement of wildlife protection laws and suburban sprawl increase the chances of crossing paths with a croc or gator. So how do you take precautions to avoid a grisly crocodilian encounter? Both alligators and crocodiles are opportunists. They aren’t likely to go chasing you down on the poolside patio. Actually, if they’re out on land, they generally aren’t looking for prey.

However, if either reptile starts hissing or snapping at you, get out of his way, and if you can’t do that, call 911 and the operator will patch you through to a wildlife hotline. On a rare chance if you find yourself or a loved one clenched in the teeth of a crocodilian, experts say fight with all you’re might. Smack them and punch them in the nose, eyes, and head, and fight them with everything you have. Most of the time they’ll let go and move off.

At the Science Center, you can get up close and personal with gators in a much safer way.  In NatureWorks, you’ll find several baby alligators in our swamp.  And you can check out our live alligator feedings every day.  Check program schedules for details!

Gator


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A giant meteorite has been found in the mountains of China. Embedded into the Altai Mountains in China’s Xinjiang Uygur province, the large rock is estimated to have a mass between 25-30 tons, says Sky and Telescope magazine. This discovery could be the country’s largest known grounded meteorite, as well as one of the largest meteorites found on Earth.

The site was investigated by a small group, led by Baolin Zhang, a meteorite specialist at the Beijing Planetarium. What they found was an oddly shaped iron meteorite sticking out of the ground, measuring about 7.5 feet long and half as wide. This is a very exciting discovery for the scientific world. The article on explains that “most meteorites were formed close to [about] 4.6 billion years ago, when the solar system was formed, any newly discovered meteorites (regardless of their size) have the potential to provide scientists with some unique insights into the formation and earliest history of our solar system."

Another iron meteorite was found in 1898 in the same region. Research is still being conducted to see if the two meteorites are related. It is still undecided on how the meteorite will be removed from its current location to be further analyzed. The largest known meteorite can be seen below. It was found in Namibia and has a mass of about 60 tons.

Meteorite


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FoxNews.com asks the question, “Is there a little Fred Flintstone in you?” Genetic analysis over the past decade suggests the answer is yes. In 2010, researchers were able to sequence the Neanderthal genome, as well as to the DNA of existing humans who are not from sub-Saharan Africa (including Australia). What the scientists found was evidence that the Neanderthals are to thank for part of our X chromosome, haplotype. Scientists were able to trace our DNA back about 80,000 to 50,000 years ago, the period when modern humans reportedly left Africa. Neanderthals left Africa about 400,000 to 800,000 years ago and evolved mostly in what are now France, Spain, Germany and Russia. Neanderthals went “extinct” about 30,000 years ago when they were absorbed by modern human population. Despite the time gap, genetic material from Neanderthals means the two populations interbred.

DiscoveryNews.com explained, “Neanderthals possessed the gene for language and had sophisticated music, art and tool craftsmanship skills, so they must have not been all that unattractive to modern humans at the time.” The research, published in the July issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution, is the result of work by an international team of researchers led by Damian Labuda of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Montreal, and the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center. The group is continuing their research on the Neanderthal and human connection, but for now, their findings have them saying, “yabba-dabba-do!” Here are some interesting facts about Neanderthals.

X-relative


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
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