Exhibit Hall

Now Open on Level 4

For centuries, the mysteries of space have captured our imagination and inspired us to look ever further into the cosmos. Now, the Orlando Science Center invites you to begin your exploration at Our Planet, Our Universe, a new permanent exhibit that takes a fascinating look at space as well as elements found right here on Earth.

An original exhibit on astronomy and earth science, Our Planet, Our Universe explores the strange, curious, and odd peculiarities of the universe and our place in it. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets and discover the latest information about our solar system. New experiences include computer-based interactives and visuals, including images direct from the NASA/Hubble Space Telescope, and hands-on exhibits that explore some strange - and some familiar - phenomena.

The exhibit is divided into distinct areas that explore earth and space - here are a few of the hands-on exhibits you'll encounter:

 

Earth, Wind & Sky

  • Aeolian Landscapes: Lets visitors manipulate fans to discover how the force of wind can shift sand into spectacular dune shapes and patterns.
  • Blue Sky: Find out why our sky is blue through manipulation of different filters in front of a light source through a medium.
  • Mars Rover: Guide a to the planetary rover over an 8’diameter simulated Martian terrain Takes the controls of the rover to move and pick up rock samples with its robotic arm while your friend watches the images the rover camera reveals.

 

Planets & Portals

  • Ask An Astronomer: interactive video kiosk featuring short, lively and entertaining answers by the astronomers at the Spitzer Space Science Center.
  • Cosmic Collisions: See what happens when galaxies collide through an interactive kiosk.
  • Tonight’s Sky: What will I see if I look up at the night sky tonight?  This software program from NASA is automatically updated every month to show appropriate stars, constellations and other objects playing on a large screen TV.

 

Gravity, Waves & Warps

  • No Sound in Space: Hear what happens when you start an alarm bell, then pump out the air. Can sound waves move through the vacuum of space?
  • Black Holes Quiz: Explore the strange and unique phenomena surrounding black holes. Take a journey into a black hole, or find out more at the black hole encyclopedia. 
  • Warping Space: Manipulate ‘stars’ and ‘planets’ along a 2D universe to see how different space can warp into 3 dimensions.

 

 

Solar storms may be a problem of the past due to prevention in the future. For the first time ever, scientist are able to see a 360-degree panorama view of the sun! NASA released these images in early February, recorded from the Solar Dynamic Observatory with those from NASA’s twin STEREO spacecraft. Scientists are now embarking on an 8-year exploration, primarily to look at the rotating sun’s far side. The goal is to be able to better predict solar storms.

A solar storm is an electrified gas cloud that erupts from the surface of the sun into space, which can damage satellites and disrupt communication systems on earth. Scientists hope that being able to predict the future of solar storms will help them find a way to prevent them. For the first time ever, the video below allows us to watch solar activity in its full 3-D dimensional glory. The video shows us a 360-degree panorama view of the sun and then zooms in on a solar eruption.


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The sky’s sheer size and beauty takes our breath away, but what exactly makes the sky so blue? Due to a phenomenon coined Rayleigh Scattering, the spectrum of colors ranging from violet to red, either pass through or deflect off of the earth’s atmosphere, which is made up of mostly nitrogen and oxygen. Longer wavelengths of red, yellow and orange colors of the spectrum have little affect on these tiny particles that make up our atmosphere.  However, shorter wavelengths of blue are deflected and are scattered all around us, causing the sky to appear blue no matter where we look.

Our Planet, Our Universe: Earth and Space, opening as a permanent exhibit on September 25, 2010, will provide guests the opportunity to discover and explore black holes, Martian terrain and of course, why our sky is blue. Allow us to beam you up to enjoy the vastness of the cosmos, as well as the complexity of our fascinating planet.

 

Blue_Sky


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility