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Synesthesia: Why Some People Hear Color or Taste Sound

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Synesthesia is a rare neurological anomaly, estimated to affect about three to five percent of the population in which the senses (smell, taste, sight, touch, and sound) intertwine. For example, associating certain letters with specific colors or tasting specific sounds. For synesthetes, it’s completely normal, for most of us it’s hard to imagine.

 

For this reason, Orlando Science Center’s adults-only Science Night Live event is thrilled to host a panel on Synesthesia featuring two synesthetes and a neuropsychologist on August 17! The engaging panel will feature the work of artist and synesthete Christina Eve whose artwork will be on display in the Fusion STEAM gallery during Science Night Live.

 

Click here to purchase your $16 Science Night Live ticket now!

About the Panel:

Christina Eve
Musician, Visual Artist and Synesthete

Christina Eve’s synesthesia comes in the form of visualizing sounds. Inherently attracted to music at a young age, she has pursued a career in music, and it wasn’t until a few years ago she discovered she had synesthesia.

 

“As a synesthete, listening to music is always an extraordinary experience since my ears, eyes, heart, and mind are all inundated. This experience of seeing sound is so remarkable, I cannot help but put these beautiful images on to canvas, so those who cannot see sound can experience this magical dimension of sound.”

 

Michael van Gelder
Photography Instructor, Musician and Synesthete

Michael van Gelder’s synesthesia is similar although no two synethetes see things the exact same way. "Since my earliest memories, sounds have been linked with colors, shapes and textures. I "listen" & "see" differently than most. It affects my everyday existence and only until recently did I discover there was a name for it. Synesthesia is a part of me, it shapes the music and photographs I create and the world around me as only I perceive it. For me, my synesthesia is a beautiful gift."

 

Dr. Megan Sherod
Clinical Associate Professor and Neuropsychologist

Dr. Sherod is a Clinical Associate Professor and Neuropsychologist in both the Department of Psychology, and the School of Communication Sciences & Disorders, at the University of Central Florida. Dr. Sherod also holds a specialty certification in Neuropsychology, Neurorehabilitation, and Clinical Neuroscience from the University of Florida.

 

She is the Founder and Director of the UCF Adaptive Community Program which pairs UCF students, faculty, and staff with members of the Orlando community that have survived stroke, brain injury, spinal cord injury, and/or are living with a neurodegenerative disease.

Science Night Live, Orlando Science Center’s adults-only night is back on August 17! From dinosaur trivia to prehistoric experiments and a special guest speaker all the way from THE Smithsonian Museum of Natural History – you won’t want to miss this 21+ event. Tickets are known to sell out for this event.

 

Click the button below to purchase your $16 ticket today. Or, if you’re a Member of Orlando Science Center, check your email to reserve your FREE ticket!

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