Exhibits

 

Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

If you haven't met Tim Walsh, he manages our NatureWorks exhibit. There's more to Tim than NatureWorks. He's regarded as an expert on turtles and recently participated in a report on the Suwannee Cooter, a protected turtle. He describes the paper like this:

“This project came about from a couple of colleagues finding large collection of butchered (for human consumption) turtles at a rural dump site. The species was identified as the protected Suwannee Cooter. This is a Species of Special Concern listed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. This find illustrated a harvest that surely exceeded the allowable take for this species. The purpose of the project was to show that this type of exploitation still exists with Florida turtles and also to describe why this is not acceptable for healthy turtle populations.

Turtles require many years (10-20) to reach maturity and their whole reproductive strategy is to reproduce as much as possible for as long as possible. Many turtles live to be 50+ years of age. It is mostly the large females that are removed as food…larger turtle=more meat. So in effect, you are removing the most important breeders from the population and the population can crash. We compare demographic data from the dump site specimens to that of the most studied population in Rainbow River.

We also make recommendations in the paper for the FFWCC to consider as additional protection for Florida’s turtles. At the time of the paper going to press, these recommendations and others were being implemented by the FFWCC due to other reasons. In July 2009 the FFWCC issued a final rule on freshwater turtle take that is the most restrictive and comprehensive conservation measure for freshwater turtles in the country.”

Thanks for your work on this Tim. Hopefully, it will affect some change!


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We're serious about our Science, but that doesn't mean we can't have a few laughs, too! On May 2nd, crowds were treated to three Standing-Room-Only performances by Willie the Clown AKA The Science Magician! Our happy harlequin host presented several magic tricks, including several that still have us scratching our heads!  But best of all, in true Science Center fashion, there was something to learn, too.   

Willie's Clues about Refraction opened guests eyes to a glass-shattering illusion, while Willie's Clues about Pressure made for a fun and confounding round of "Three Card Monte!"   

In a related note, nuclear physicist and OSC Volunteer Bill Kahn has performed his unique brand of theatrical Clownology for years, delighting audiences at various shelters, hospitals, and assisted living facilities. Mr. Kahn, who represents Willie in all of his business dealings and recommendations for pizza toppings, has hinted that in the very near future, the lovable Science Magician may pop up again!

 


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The Florida Dairy Farmers have sponsored a new display in our KidsTown area, which provides fascinating facts on how milk moooves from the farm to our fridge. Check out the giant interactive milk glass just inside KidsTown.

Answer questions correctly about milk's journey from cow to cup and watch the giant drinking straw at the top of the display fill up with white liquid. But watch out - a wrong answer drains the milk from the straw. While kids enjoy the tasty trivia, parents can relax and learn about Florida's dairy industry from an engaging video presentation (available in both English and Spanish).

The new milk display is located in the former home of the Super Service Center, but don't despair car lovers...we're just giving the beloved display a complete overhaul. It will be back soon, and better than ever, in its new home inside the All Aboard exhibit on Level 2.

 


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Tiny garage is now a centerpiece for All Aboard on Level 2

A beloved fixture of KidsTown returns with a new paint job and a new home! The Super Service Center is now delighting little mechanics on level 2 inside All Aboard. Step into a pretend auto shop equipped with all the tools needed to perform maintenance on a kid-sized car mounted on a lift.

This exhibit's hands-on activities encourage cooperative play and stimulate the development of fundamental skills in young children. Kids will have fun sorting, matching and problem-solving as they select tools, replace parts and fill work orders. The Super Service Center has a received a tune-up, including a new paint job for the little auto that’s the centerpiece of the display.

All Aboard inspires your little one’s imagination with a series of vehicles just their size! No destination is too far. Child-sized models of trains, planes, automobiles, even the space shuttle, provide the mode of transportation - creativity provides the road map. All Aboard is a great way for kids to learn about transportation, as well as geography.

 

Super-Service-Center


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Needless to say, there's been a lot of news coverage regarding the earthquake in Haiti and your kids might be wondering what happened. We found this description on a web site called weatherwizkids.com.  It's run by a meterologist at an Indianapolis TV station, Crystal Wicker. It's designed for kids and is a great way to explain earthquakes to your little ones.

"There are about 20 plates along the surface of the earth that move continuously and slowly past each other. When the plates squeeze or stretch, huge rocks form at their edges and the rocks shift with great force, causing an earthquake. Think of it this way: Imagine holding a pencil horizontally. If you were to apply a force to both ends of the pencil by pushing down on them, you would see the pencil bend. After enough force was applied, the pencil would break in the middle, releasing the stress you have put on it. The Earth's crust acts in the same way. As the plates move they put forces on themselves and each other. When the force is large enough, the crust is forced to break. When the break occurs, the stress is released as energy which moves through the Earth in the form of waves, which we feel and call an earthquake."

For more on this, visit the website at weatherwizkids.com.



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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility