What's New

The earliest horned dinosaur fossil-skull can now found at the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History in Norman, Oklahoma, and has been coined Titanoceratop ouranos. The new species of dinosaurs is uniquely known for the size of its head, estimated at 8-feet long, and its overall weight, estimated at 6,550 kilograms.

The fossil skull was discovered in 1941 in New Mexico, and spent fifty-four years in museum storage before it was pieced together and ready to be displayed. Paleontologists are currently facing some difficulties placing the species into a family tree; arguing if it resembles the Pentaceratops or the Triceratops. Until recently, the beast was considered to be related to the Pentaceratops, but new inclinations regarding its physical face structure suggest relations to the Triceratops. This theory would place its evolution 5 million years earlier than originally considered and would propose that there are a lot of other horned dinosaurs yet to be discovered.

On the flip side, there are some paleontologists that still believe the Titanoceratops is part of the Pentaceratops family. They are claiming that although the fossils bones are oversized compared to the “not-so-titanic” species, it may be in its growth stage.  The debate still continues, but either way the Titanoceratop is a colossal dinosaur with an oddly enormous skull.

Pentaceratops


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Two new species of freshwater stingrays have been discovered in the Amazon rain forest! They are being called “Pancake stingrays” because they look like pancakes with tails. The last new Amazon stingray found was in 1987. Researchers have also found a new species of catfish that has a pattern that resembles a jaguar’s spots. This just shows that there are so many species on Earth we have yet to discover!

Don’t forget that we have daily stingray feedings here at the Orlando Science Center, so stop by and watch our local stingrays enjoy a meal and learn more about these interesting creatures!

 

Pancake_Stingray

Misty is an Animal Care Technician at the Science Center and is found in NatureWorks. Animals and Ecology are her passions and she jumps at every opportunity to talk about it. Stop in and say Hello!


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Jane Goodall was one of three women that the famed anthropologist Louis Leakey sponsored to study primates in the wild.  Raised by missionaries in a Kenyan village, Leaky was fascinated by the connections between man and animal. Leakey made several discoveries in the study of human evolution. He sent Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Birute Galdikas into the wilds of Africa and Indonesia to learn about primates in their natural habitat and gain incite into what our own pre humans ancestors might have been like.

While Goodall studied chimpanzees, Fossey observed gorillas and Galdikas investigated  orangutans - all at a time when field work was seen as a job only for men.  Their discoveries changed the way the world saw not only women but also our closest animal relations.

Leakeys_Angels


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Solar storms may be a problem of the past due to prevention in the future. For the first time ever, scientist are able to see a 360-degree panorama view of the sun! NASA released these images in early February, recorded from the Solar Dynamic Observatory with those from NASA’s twin STEREO spacecraft. Scientists are now embarking on an 8-year exploration, primarily to look at the rotating sun’s far side. The goal is to be able to better predict solar storms.

A solar storm is an electrified gas cloud that erupts from the surface of the sun into space, which can damage satellites and disrupt communication systems on earth. Scientists hope that being able to predict the future of solar storms will help them find a way to prevent them. For the first time ever, the video below allows us to watch solar activity in its full 3-D dimensional glory. The video shows us a 360-degree panorama view of the sun and then zooms in on a solar eruption.


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Take the time to learn about the letter B while making this simple Mardi Gras mask. This will certainly show the little ones in your family that learning can be fun. The letter B is the perfect shape to make a mask so why not take this time to teach them the importance of knowing their letters and sounds. Your family will be ready for Mardi Gras in no time; with great fashion and originality when you are done with this craft.

Supplies
  • Construction paper or colored printable card stock
  • Craft stick or drinking straw
  • Scotch tape
  • Feathers
  • Curly ribbons
  • Safety Scissors
  • Make alphabet letters on your mask with any of these:
  • Alphabet stickers/stamps,or draw letters with crayons
Instructions
  1. Draw the letter "B" on construction paper. Make sure the size is just right for you to wear it as a mask. You may also opt to print out this template on colored card stock instead.
  2. Cut the letter "B". You may need an adult's help in cutting out the eyeholes.
  3. Decorate the front side of the mask with alphabet letters. Stick alphabet stickers, use alphabet stamps or write the letters using crayons.
  4. Tape a craft stick or a drinking straw at the back to make the handle.
  5. Tape feathers and/or curly ribbons at the back as well. Click here on how to make your own curly ribbons.

Your mask is now ready to wear!

 

Letter_B

 


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Ever wonder how a cloud is formed? Try this experiment to find out. You can make your own homemade cloud by using simple ingredients. A cloud needs three basic ingredients to be formed, water vapor; dust, smoke or other particles in the air; and a drop in air pressure. With all these ingredients present you can create a cloud, even at home!  This experiment involves matches, so kids - don't try this without an adult!

Materials
  • 2-liter clear plastic pop bottle
  • matches (children will need adult assistance to light matches)
  • warm water
Process
  1. Fill the clear plastic 2-liter bottle one-third full of warm water and place the cap on. As warm water evaporates, it adds water vapor to the air inside the bottle. This is the first ingredient to make a cloud.
  2. Squeeze and release the bottle and observe what happens. You’ll notice that nothing happens. Why? The squeeze represents the warming that occurs in the atmosphere. The release represents the cooling that occurs in the atmosphere. If the inside of the bottle becomes cover with condensation or water droplets, just shake the bottle to get rid of them.
  3. Take the cap off the bottle. Carefully light a match and hold the match near the opening of the bottle.
  4. Then drop the match in the bottle and quickly put on the cap, trapping the smoke inside. Dust, smoke or other particles in the air is the second ingredient to make a cloud.
  5. Once again, slowly squeeze the bottle hard and release. What happens? A cloud appears when you release and disappears when you squeeze. The third ingredient in clouds is a drop in air pressure.
Explanation

Water vapor, water in its invisible gaseous state, can be made to condense into the form of small cloud droplets. By adding particles such as the smoke enhances the process of water condensation and by squeezing the bottle causes the air pressure to drop. This creates a cloud!

 


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The Kepler mission hit another home run with the discovery of 1,235 possible new planets in the galaxy! These “exo” or “extra” planets are scattered across the Milky Way— large and small—orbiting stars other than the sun. Wondering how the Kepler spacecraft works? This planet locater is actually a telescope that follows the earth around its orbit of the sun, recording what it sees. The Kepler telescope is always pointed at the same area in the sky, so when there are changes in the starlight, it shows that a planet is close at hand. When the planet passes by the telescope, the light will dim and then return to normal. According to Science News, this will allow scientists to begin composing a galactic planetary census which will show how many planets are in the galaxy.

Kepler_1

NASA’s quest to find a planet that inhabits life is currently in full swing, more than ever before. This discovery gives scientists new and original locations to hunt, causing an astronomy frenzy! Scientist will be looking at locations where the exoplanets orbit around a star, allowing the perfect temperature for life, creating a habitable or “goldilocks” zone—not too hot, not too cold, but just right.

There are now 54 prospective planets in that zone, the smallest are about the size of Earth. This is a new chapter for scientist in the field of astronomy, in the search to find another earth-like planet.

Kepler_2


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Orlando Science Center • 777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
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