Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

Until recently, the eastern diamondback rattlesnake used to be one of the most common snakes that could be found in the Central Florida area just hanging out in your backyard or residing near a body of water. The diamondback populates the woodlands and costal habitats from southern North Carolina to Florida; however, their presence continues to diminish as time goes on.  Due to indiscriminate killing, hunting and widespread loss of habitat, the number of diamondbacks has been steadily declining.

The eastern diamondback is not endangered, however. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced earlier this summer a 90-day finding for a petition to list the eastern diamondback rattlesnake as a threatened species. The organization is currently researching and reviewing the status of the species to determine if the threatened species classification is warranted under the Endangered Species Act.

The Fish and Wildlife Service has taken action by reaching out to state and federal natural resource agencies for information regarding the eastern diamondback and its habitat.  A number of different parties have come together to help address this issue, as one of Florida’s well-known habitants slowly disappears.   Once the review is complete, the listing of the eastern diamondback as an endangered species will either be: warranted; warranted, but precluded by other higher priority activities; or not warranted at all.

easterndiamondback


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While Florida is no stranger to scorching summer heat, heat waves can be extremely dangerous to humans, animals and even plants. We thought we’d share with you some awareness information so that you can be better prepared should a heat wave occur.

What is a Heat Wave?

A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessive heat, often combined with excessive humidity, with very little air movement to help cool things down.

Why are Heat Waves Dangerous?

During heat waves, the human body is pushed beyond its limits. Under normal conditions, the body's internal thermostat produces perspiration that evaporates and cools the body. However, in excessive heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.

By being conscious of the signs, you can recognize heat-related illness before it gets serious.

Heat Cramps

Muscle pains and spasms caused by heavy exertion, which triggers loss of water through heavy perspiration. These usually involve the muscles of the abdomen or legs. Heat cramps are usually an early sign that the body is having trouble with heat.

Heat Exhaustion

Typically involves the loss of body fluids through heavy sweating during strenuous physical activity or physical labor in high heat and humidity. Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale or flushed skin; heavy sweating; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.

Heat Stroke (also known as Sunstroke)

A life-threatening condition in which a person’s temperature control system stops working and the body is unable to cool itself. Signs of heat stroke include hot, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; vomiting; and high body temperature.

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In 2002, paleontologists found the second-oldest mammal skull just outside of a rural village in northern Argentina. At the time, the skull was mostly hidden in rock and its identity remained a mystery. In 2005, scientists sent the skull to a technician who, until recently, has been removing the rock from around the fossil – finally revealing a saber-toothed, squirrel-like creature with a striking similarity to the Ice Age character Scrat. The new species, named Cronopio dentiacutus for its narrow snout and long fangs, was about 8 to 9 inches (20 to 23 centimeters) long and likely used its pointy teeth to hunt and eat insects.

Both mammals and dinosaurs appeared near the end of the Triassic period, some 220 million years ago. When dinosaurs disappeared about 65 million years ago, mammals thrived. But ancient mammal fossils are still exceedingly rare, mostly because of their small sizes. As a result, paleontologists know of roughly one genus of mammal for every million years between 65 million and 220 million years ago—making for a woefully incomplete record.

cronopio-dentiacutus


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On June 24 the world lost a superstar and an icon; at least within the wildlife conservation community. It was not a movie star, rock star or a reality TV personality… his name was George, "Lonesome George", and he was the last Pinta Island tortoise on Earth. Pinta Island is the northernmost island within the Galapagos Archipelago.

The islands are of course famous for Darwin, finches, strange iguanas, and of course, giant tortoises. The Galapagos Islands are situated about 620 miles off the coast of Ecuador and until fairly recent times were some of the most remote and desolate islands in the world. The islands are millions of years old and volcanic in origin and all native species arrived on the islands soon after their volcanic beginnings pierced the ocean surface. Animals and plants must have arrived by sea or air. The reptile fauna of the islands have ancestors on the mainland South American continent and traveled via either direct floating in ocean currents or on natural rafts of trees or vegetation. Reptiles are well adapted to surviving weeks at sea without access to fresh water or food. In fact, the only two non-marine mammal species native to the islands are two bat and two rice rat species.

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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility