Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

Think about a shallow tide pool that is subject to enormous changes in salinity, temperature, and water level. Now try to imagine the deepest, coldest, darkest part of the ocean, which is over 36,000 feet underwater. The open ocean covers nearly 70% of our entire planet, with an incredible abundance of all kinds of life.

In doing some research for an upcoming floor program on the different ocean animals and the zones of the ocean they live in, I read about an amazing program called the Census of Marine Life, which is a ten year project to try and document life in the ocean from all different locations and depths. The ultimate goal of the project was to develop a better understanding of the ocean and its inhabitants by researching the number of species, where they live, and how many live there. It is hard enough to try and keep track of a few fish in a fish tank, let alone to try and document all the species in the ocean!

If you are interested in learning more visit: www.coml.org.

Antarctic Ice Fish


Bookmark and Share

Hello everyone! Hope your week is going well. Those who have been to KidsTown this past week have seen the scaffolding that went from KidsTown floor all the way up to the fourth floor. We had a team of people using the scaffolding to place tint on all of our windows. This will help us to keep KidsTown and other places in the building cooler during the warmer parts of the year and will also help us to conserve energy.

As most of you may have experienced, this week has not been one of our warmer parts of the year, it has been quite chilly. Now is a good time to talk about what happens when things cool down or even freeze. What is the freezing point of water? How are snowflakes formed? What conditions are required to have snow fall? Why is it that we do not have usually have snow in Florida?

Here are some fun activities to do as you explore these questions: www.sciencekids.co.nz/experiments/snowflake.html and www.dltk-holidays.com/winter/3dsnowflakes.htm.


Bookmark and Share

Here at the Science Center, we have baby alligators that are about two to three years old. In one lifetime, they’ll go through about 2,000-3,000 teeth because of the constant wear down they experience. In the wild, they eat fish, small mammals, birds, and other reptiles. We feed them a diet of chicken and reptile pellets, but we’d like to remind our guests to not feed alligators in the wild.

Naturally timid of humans, alligators begin to associate food with people once they get into the habit of being fed. It’s very dangerous and leads to an increase of alligator attacks. Visit NatureWorks to feed our gators without the worry!


Bookmark and Share

Being a carnivorous animal, an Eastern Indigo Snake’s diet consists of turtles, fish, birds, small alligators and other snakes, venomous and non-venomous. Primiarily found in Central and South Florida, Eastern Indigo Snakes frequent flatwoods, dry glades and sandy soils. Humans are the biggest known threat to these snakes because of highway fatalities, pet trade and habitat destruction. These creatures are enlisted as an endangered species and if you happen to see one in your yard, please contact the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission 1-888-404-3922.

Indigo_Snake


Bookmark and Share

Orlando Science Center • 777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.or[email protected]
  Supported by the City of Orlando, Orange County, and United Arts of Central Florida with funds from the United Arts campaign and the State of Florida,
Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Privacy Policy