Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

The sky’s sheer size and beauty takes our breath away, but what exactly makes the sky so blue? Due to a phenomenon coined Rayleigh Scattering, the spectrum of colors ranging from violet to red, either pass through or deflect off of the earth’s atmosphere, which is made up of mostly nitrogen and oxygen. Longer wavelengths of red, yellow and orange colors of the spectrum have little affect on these tiny particles that make up our atmosphere.  However, shorter wavelengths of blue are deflected and are scattered all around us, causing the sky to appear blue no matter where we look.

Our Planet, Our Universe: Earth and Space, opening as a permanent exhibit on September 25, 2010, will provide guests the opportunity to discover and explore black holes, Martian terrain and of course, why our sky is blue. Allow us to beam you up to enjoy the vastness of the cosmos, as well as the complexity of our fascinating planet.

 

Blue_Sky


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Most folks rarely give much of a thought to Torosaurus, except for the trivia answers to “Which animal has the longest skull of any land creature, ever?” But some people seem to feel inexplicably attached to this name, often and incorrectly translated as "bull lizard" (it's got big horns, and was ornery like a raging bull!). In reality it means "perforated lizard", in reference to the holes in its frill. These innocuously incomplete frill holes are at the center of the newest paleocontroversy, which has some scientists ready to erase the name Torosaurus from the dictionary altogether!

Torosaurus

See also: Obsolete.

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Answer: a mind (and toe, and finger, and just general body) numbing -100°C (or -148°F!). Where is this place, and what does it mean to you? Well, the coldest place on Earth is known as “Dome A,” or “Dome Argus,” and is located in the middle of Antarctica. It is known as the summit of the “East Antarctic Ice Cap,” which is in essence a large “mountain” of ice in Antarctica. What this means to you is that you would probably freeze to death in seconds if you went there unprotected (never mind the elevation and oxygen issues).

What is interesting to note is that dry ice (frozen Carbon Dioxide) is generally kept at around –78.5°C (or -109°F). This means that if you brought a block of dry ice to Dome A, it would actually get colder. We sure do live on a crazy planet!

 

Dome_A


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To prepare liquid nitrogen through the process of liquidation, molecular energy from Nitrogen is removed. So the liquid has little to no energy and is also a freezing temperature. When the liquid is exposed to regular conditions, the molecules inside the liquid start absorbing the heat energy from its surroundings causing it to boil. Liquid nitrogen even boils at temperatures below zero!!

 

OSC_Sub_Zero_Host_012_Web


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER, A FLORIDA-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH2342), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.