Exhibits

 

Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

Red lionfish are beautiful fish that are becoming quite a problem for Florida. Lionfish are an invasive species to the Atlantic Ocean. An invasive species is an animal or plant that is introduced to a new habitat and negatively affects it. Florida has many invasive species due to its warm tropical climate.

In the case of the lionfish, they are destroying the local fish, shrimp, and crab populations by eating so many of them. Since lionfish have no natural enemy in the Atlantic Ocean, the lionfish population is exploding. Everyone has been trying to find a way to get rid of these pesky fish.

Lionfish

A Key Largo based REEF conservation organization has created a lionfish cookbook to create a demand for these fish to be caught and sold at fish markets. Their slogan is “Eat ‘em to Beat ‘em” and its true!  The faster we remove these fish the sooner the local biodiversity can return to what it was before the troublesome lionfish came to town.

Want to try it for yourself? Check out www.reef.org to buy the cookbook. Hopefully we’ll be seeing some of these delicious recipes in our local restaurants too!

Lionfish_Cookbook

Misty is an Animal Care Technician at the Science Center and is found in NatureWorks. Animals and Ecology are her passions and she jumps at every opportunity to talk about it. Stop in and say Hello!


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This just goes to show anyone can be a scientist, regardless of age. A class of 8-10 year olds was enlisted by Dr. Beau Lotto of LottoLabs in England to study bees. Dr. Lotto wanted a fresh look at old data but what he got was more than that; the kids had taken the assignment to heart and ended up uncovering new findings regarding how bees look for food and decide which flowers might have the most nectar.

For the full story, check out: http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/site/misc/BlackawtonBees.xhtml

"They can because they think they can." - Virgil, Roman epic poet

BlackawtonBees


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Researchers at Hetaoping Research and Conservation Center in China believe that dressing up as a panda while working with captive born panda cubs is beneficial to the animals living a normal life in the wild. The panda suit helps the panda cub imprint on pandas instead of humans. Imprinting is a behavioral adaptation that gives an animal its identity and gives it an image of what its future mate should look like and what to guard its territory against.In the wild, animals imprint upon their parents.

However in captivity, there are lots of humans around who interact with the young cub, taking measurements and giving it health exams, that the cub might imprint on humans and think it is human. This may sound silly, but this occurs quite often with young birds. Animals who imprint on humans do not survive well in the wild, thus the hope that the researchers dressed as a panda will help the young panda cub imprint on pandas and live a successful life in the wild.

Panda Dress Up

Check out these websites to see more pictures and learn more information about their research:

latimesblogs.latimes.com/unleashed/2010/12/panda-costume.html

www.nypost.com/p/news/international/this_li_panda_getting_tricked_treated_qFs21U8AAdrvsu7lYhnf3H

Misty is an Animal Care Technician at the Science Center and is found in NatureWorks. Animals and Ecology are her passions and she jumps at every opportunity to talk about it. Stop in and say Hello!


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The following table will give you some suggestions around the best exhibits for each age/grade. Needless to say, you know your child best, but this should be a good guide. As you can see, there’s something for everyone. We encourage you to click on each exhibit’s link and take a look at what each one has to offer. As always, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to let us know.

 

PreK - K Grades
1 - 2
Grades
3 - 5
Grades
6 - 8
Grades
9 - 12
KidsTown
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  • .
NatureWorks
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All Aboard
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Science Park
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Engineer It!
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  • .
  • .
DinoDigs
  • .
  • .
  • .
  • .
Our Planet, Our Universe
  • .
  • .
  • .

 


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Hi - My name is Jim White and I provide public programming using the Science Center's Hitach S-3500N scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Orlando Science Center is one of the few places in the US where the public can get up close and personal with an SEM and see its capabilities. The SEM has many advantages over light/optical microscopes and I will explain those in future posts. Some of its capabilities include high magnification (up to 100,000X in optimum conditions) and elemental analysis.

I choose from a variety of samples to observe each day I am here. Some of the items we have observed in the past include bugs, fibers, and coins.

Currently, I mainly do programs on a few weekend days a month. I will be posting my schedule as it is firmed up so you will know when I will be here and you can, hopefully, come by the SEM laboratory on Level 4 at the back of DinoDigs.

I will be posting a new blog at least every two weeks and will be talking about items dealing with the SEM as well as other subjects that I think you will find interesting.

Hope to see you soon,
"SEM Jim"


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility

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