Exhibits

 

Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

Planes are built to endure the most extreme weather conditions including lightening strikes.

Let us dispel the myth that if your plane gets struck by lightning it could spell disaster. This is not true. In fact, a plane getting struck by lightning is a common occurrence in aviation and has little effect on the flight. As far as anyone knows, the odds are that each airliner in the USA will be hit by lightning roughly once a year.

Because most airplanes are made of aluminum, a good natural conductor of electricity, lightening is able to flow along the airplanes outer skin and back into the atmosphere. This coupled with the fact that, all airplanes are required to have a built-in system ensuring that a spark will not ignite fuel or fuel vapor in tanks or fuel lines, makes airplanes adapt well to lightning strikes. During a 1980s lightning research project, NASA flew an F-106B jet into 1,400 thunderstorms and lightning hit it at least 700 times, without any cause for concern. Still, this led to requirements to have built-in lightning protection for electronics as an extra precaution.

Although lightning striking an airplane may seem extreme and potentially disastrous, it really is quite an uneventful phenomena in the aviation community. Planes are designed with many extra precautions to prevent lightening from ruining your travel experience. Rest assured, next time you fly through a lightning storm, just remember, you are flying high and dry through some of the safest front-row seats to one of nature’s most fearsome phenomena.

Planes_in_Lightning


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Mini isn’t just for i-Pods anymore. Mason Peck, a Cornell University professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering led the production of three 1-inch square satellites that flew with the Endeavour space shuttle in May. The small satellites, called Sprites, have a big task of measuring conditions in space and collecting information on chemistry, radiation and particle impacts. Since they’re the size of a postage stamp, it will be easy for Sprites to drift with space particles and settle on the International Space Station for a few years.  Large satellites can cost millions of dollars, which is why scientists are trying to downsize the technology. They hope the Sprites will open doors to future small-sized exploration for communication and further data collecting abilities in space.  This is one small piece of technology for "one giant leap for mankind."

Mini__Satelite_2


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Have you ever wondered if it is possible to see a rainbow at night? After all, rainbows are generally made from sunlight shining through raindrops. Although seeing a rainbow at night may seem like an odd thing to contemplate, it is possible.

Night rainbows are incredibly rare and often difficult to see, but not impossible. If the moon is bright enough and the atmosphere offers the right conditions, night rainbows, also called moonbows or lunar rainbows, can occur.

Just like a normal rainbow, this phenomenon happens when light is split up into the different colors of the spectrum. When the light bounces off the back of a raindrop, it causes the colorful display of light to streak across the sky.

However, because moonlight is not nearly as bright as the sun, the moonbow appears much dimmer. Without much light for our eyes to take in, moonbows can appear muted and grayish or even ghostly white. Only a full moon, or nearly full moon can produce enough light to make a night rainbow. Even with enough light from a full moon, there still needs to be the right conditions to produce a rain-shower while still having enough breaks in the clouds to allow light through. If you ever get a chance to see one, be sure to take in the beauty the night has to offer and snap a photo.

lunar_rainbow

Image courtesy of Starry Night Skies Photography


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This book is not only fun to read about but is extremely educational - for adults as well as children. This book is also great for pre – teens or teens who read at a lower reading level. It is full of fascinating facts about all kinds of plants. It describes a variety of plants with unusual characteristics including those that give off light and those that eat insects.

Come curl up under our big story tree and listen to a great story! Check our schedule for times!

Plants_Do_Amzing_Things


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Tyrannosaurus rex is one the most popular dinosaurs around, which means we study him a lot. There has been a lot of talk about all aspects of his life; how he hunted, how he moved, etc. Click here for an article about T-rex’s tail and how it helped him not only to keep balance, but also to be a better runner.

This will be one of the first in a small series I’ll do about the star of DinoDigs, Mr. T-rex. Make sure to tune in during the following weeks for more information and discoveries about our favorite carnivorous Cretaceous dino.

T_Rex_-_Field

Painting courtesy of Field Museum

Stephanie is a Science Interpreter at the Science Center and often is found in Dino Digs or Careers for Life. Paleontology, Anthropology and Anatomy are her passion and jumps at every opportunity to talk about it. Stop in and say Hello!


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility