What's New

New Original Exhibit Promotes Earth and Space Science Through Hands-On Displays

Permanent Display Begins on September 25, 2010

Orlando, FL - September 20, 2010 - Our Planet, Our Universe is an original exhibit on astronomy and earth science, developed by the Orlando Science Center, which premieres as part of the Science Center’s permanent collection on September 25. The exhibit is a combination of new interactive experiences and classic favorites that provide hands-on exploration of the dynamic forces that shape our planet and our universe.

In addition, the Science Center has partnered with WFTV Channel 9 to create the Severe Weather Center 9 interactive exhibit experience, which will be displayed within Our Planet, Our Universe. This exhibit, presented by WFTV Channel 9, is a replica of the station’s weather center that is seen on television. This display was fabricated by the FX Group, the same designers that put together WFTV's actual weather center. Interactive multimedia presentations featuring WFTV’s Chief Meteorologist, Tom Terry, and the Channel 9 weather team explore the skills and technology at work to predict severe storms.

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The sky’s sheer size and beauty takes our breath away, but what exactly makes the sky so blue? Due to a phenomenon coined Rayleigh Scattering, the spectrum of colors ranging from violet to red, either pass through or deflect off of the earth’s atmosphere, which is made up of mostly nitrogen and oxygen. Longer wavelengths of red, yellow and orange colors of the spectrum have little affect on these tiny particles that make up our atmosphere.  However, shorter wavelengths of blue are deflected and are scattered all around us, causing the sky to appear blue no matter where we look.

Our Planet, Our Universe: Earth and Space, opening as a permanent exhibit on September 25, 2010, will provide guests the opportunity to discover and explore black holes, Martian terrain and of course, why our sky is blue. Allow us to beam you up to enjoy the vastness of the cosmos, as well as the complexity of our fascinating planet.

 

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Science Center Presents The Big Top for Big Kids

Cocktails, Magicians, Stilt Walkers, Comedians, Film Premieres and More!
Saturday, September 11, 6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Orlando, FL - September 6, 2010 - It’s some serious circus fun for the young at heart during Cocktails & Cosmos at the Orlando Science Center on Saturday, September 11. From 6:00 to 10:00 p.m., this event will feature live entertainment and the premiere of Forces of Nature on the giant screen of the Dr. Phillips CineDome. Indulge in Downtown Orlando’s most scientifically unique and socially inclined experience with Happy Hour food and drink specials, followed by an evening of music, art, and film.

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Run/Walk to Benefit the Orlando Science Center

August 14, 2010, Begins 7:30 a.m. at the Science Center

 

WHAT: Presented by Florida Hospital and the Track Shack Foundation, the Annual Celebration of Running 5K will be held at the Orlando Science Center in Loch Haven Park on August 14, 2010. The Celebration of Running 5K is part of a month long celebration (and sale) at the Track Shack, which commemorates 32 years of business, and kicks off the famous Grand Prix series.

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Kim Button is a Green Living Consultant and Environmental Reporter who has a very popular blog on Green issues. She recently posted a few articles related to our Green Building Tour and the other displays we are using to promote energy efficiency, renewable energy and recycling.

Article 1, Article 2, Article 3

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Answer: a mind (and toe, and finger, and just general body) numbing -100°C (or -148°F!). Where is this place, and what does it mean to you? Well, the coldest place on Earth is known as “Dome A,” or “Dome Argus,” and is located in the middle of Antarctica. It is known as the summit of the “East Antarctic Ice Cap,” which is in essence a large “mountain” of ice in Antarctica. What this means to you is that you would probably freeze to death in seconds if you went there unprotected (never mind the elevation and oxygen issues).

What is interesting to note is that dry ice (frozen Carbon Dioxide) is generally kept at around –78.5°C (or -109°F). This means that if you brought a block of dry ice to Dome A, it would actually get colder. We sure do live on a crazy planet!

 

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To prepare liquid nitrogen through the process of liquidation, molecular energy from Nitrogen is removed. So the liquid has little to no energy and is also a freezing temperature. When the liquid is exposed to regular conditions, the molecules inside the liquid start absorbing the heat energy from its surroundings causing it to boil. Liquid nitrogen even boils at temperatures below zero!!

 

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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER, A FLORIDA-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH2342), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.