What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs.

Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

Science Live! programs at the Science Center include:

  • Digital Adventure Theater stage shows
  • DinoSafaris in DinoDigs
  • StoryTime and Messy Afternoons in KidsTown
  • Science Live! tabletop demonstrations
  • Animal interactions, such as alligator feedings and swamp talks
  • And much more

 

So, on your next trip to the Science Center, make sure you take the time to interact with our staff and volunteers during one of our Science Live! programs. It’s sure to make your visit memorable!

 

Every year people around the world celebrate the irrational, infinite number that is pi, and the Science Center is no different. On Pi Day, March 14 (3/14), folks here got to learn about the mathematical constant all while enjoying a nice slice of edible pie! Pi, represented by the Greek letter “π”, is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159. You know what that means? Next year will be 3/14/15! We'll be sure to bring some extra dessert for the occasion.

Photo Credit: Rachael Moore


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DNA Day at the Orlando Science Center is just a month away, so in honor of this amazing molecule I thought it would be neat to look over some genetics news.

This article is from last year, but the research continues. Neanderthals, or cavemen, have long been thought to be dull, slow and stupid, (thus the whole Geico thing about being so easy a caveman could do it). Ever since the reconstruction of the remains at La Chapelle aux Saints in 1911 by Marcellin Boule, the general public has had the idea that Neanderthals stood hunched-over, with their arms drooping down and that they moved slowly. In fact, this is a mistake. The remains from La Chapelle Aux Saints turn out to be those of an old man who had severe arthritis. Of course he would have walked slowly and been hunched over, but Boule thought this idea applied to all Neanderthals.

Much work had been done since then, but analyzing bones can only get you so far. That’s where this study comes in; a group of researchers from the Max Planck Institute are looking into DNA preserved in different specimens. What can we tell from this? For one, we can see how different Neanderthals really were from modern humans and we can get ideas about why you don’t see more cavemen around today.

If you think this is cool, imagine what it would be like to ask one of these researchers questions about their findings. On May 7, DNA Day, you can have that chance; Dr. Emily Hodges from the research team will be available via Skype for questions!

For more information, click here to view the full article.

Stephanie is a Science Interpreter at the Science Center and often is found in DinoDigs or Careers for Life. Paleontology, Anthropology and Anatomy are her passion and jumps at every opportunity to talk about it. Stop in and say Hello!

 


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Think about a shallow tide pool that is subject to enormous changes in salinity, temperature, and water level. Now try to imagine the deepest, coldest, darkest part of the ocean, which is over 36,000 feet underwater. The open ocean covers nearly 70% of our entire planet, with an incredible abundance of all kinds of life.

In doing some research for an upcoming floor program on the different ocean animals and the zones of the ocean they live in, I read about an amazing program called the Census of Marine Life, which is a ten year project to try and document life in the ocean from all different locations and depths. The ultimate goal of the project was to develop a better understanding of the ocean and its inhabitants by researching the number of species, where they live, and how many live there. It is hard enough to try and keep track of a few fish in a fish tank, let alone to try and document all the species in the ocean!

If you are interested in learning more visit: www.coml.org.

Antarctic Ice Fish


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Answer: a mind (and toe, and finger, and just general body) numbing -100°C (or -148°F!). Where is this place, and what does it mean to you? Well, the coldest place on Earth is known as “Dome A,” or “Dome Argus,” and is located in the middle of Antarctica. It is known as the summit of the “East Antarctic Ice Cap,” which is in essence a large “mountain” of ice in Antarctica. What this means to you is that you would probably freeze to death in seconds if you went there unprotected (never mind the elevation and oxygen issues).

What is interesting to note is that dry ice (frozen Carbon Dioxide) is generally kept at around –78.5°C (or -109°F). This means that if you brought a block of dry ice to Dome A, it would actually get colder. We sure do live on a crazy planet!

To check out some substances that are actually hundreds of degrees colder than Dome A (or dry ice), check out the new Orlando Science Center show Sub-Zero, playing every Saturday in July.

 

Dome_A


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To prepare liquid nitrogen through the process of liquidation, molecular energy from Nitrogen is removed. So the liquid has little to no energy and is also a freezing temperature. When the liquid is exposed to regular conditions, the molecules inside the liquid start absorbing the heat energy from its surroundings causing it to boil. Liquid nitrogen even boils at temperatures below zero!!

For more interesting facts and experiments with liquid nitrogen, come and check out Sub-Zero beginning July 3rd and only offered on Saturdays throughout the summer!!

 

OSC_Sub_Zero_Host_012_Web


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Orlando Science Center • 777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
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