Join us for a unique event at the Orlando Science Center...

  

4th Annual Science of Wine

May 10, 2014, 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Join us for a night of wine and gourmet food! The Science of Wine is a unique wine and food tasting with an educational twist. Over 150 of the finest wines from all of the major regions of the world will be represented. Local gourmet restaurants and caterers will also be present to pair the wines with a variety of delectable dishes.

This is a unique event that offers a chance to celebrate and network with others who enjoy the culture of wine. We look forward to seeing you!

 

Tickets

Purchase Online Now

Member Tickets: $70
General Public: $85

Tickets now available. Last year’s event sold out, so plan on purchasing your tickets early!

 


 

Sponsorship Opportunities

Sponsorship Information

2013 Science of Wine was a sell-out event. ,If you or your business would like to partner with the Orlando Science Center at Science of Wine, sponsorship opportunities are available from $2,000 to $10,000. All levels of sponsorship include tickets to this highly sought after event as well as various levels of promotional benefits. Science of Wine provides a well-defined audience that allows a sponsor to realize positive ROI for its sponsorship investment.

Heartfelt thanks to Akerman returning for the fourth consecutive year to be the Presenting Sponsor and Southern Wine & Spirits, also, returning for the fourth consecutive year to be our Wine Sponsor. If you’d like to join these organizations and businesses committed to STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) educational initiatives in Central Florida, please contact Kathy Lopus at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


2013 Sponsors:
SOW 2013 Sponsors

 

 

Planning Committee

Thanks to the commitment, enthusiasm and leadership of the Science of Wine Planning Committee, the Science of Wine has become one of the more popular events in the Science Center’s calendar.  If you’d like to network with a hard-working but fun-loving group of professionals like yourself, please contact our Committee Chair, Dawn Luttrell at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Auction Donations

A highlight of the evening is an extensive array of auction items available to the highest bidder! If you would like to have a presence at the Science of wine by donating an auction item, we’d be delighted to hear from you. Please contact Lindsay Barry at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 


 

Learning About Wine

While we are pleased and proud to enjoy over 150+ fine wines from Southern Wine & Spirits and partner with a vast range of culinary treats from Orlando area restaurants and caterers, our guests tell us that what makes Science of Wine completely unique is Orlando Science Center’s educational programming about Wine! All the educational content is engaging, hands on and interactive. So, enjoy, wine, dine and learn about the Science of Wine!

 

Wine & Learn Stations:

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These are casual, self-propelled stations located in Our Planet, Our Universe where our Education Partners from Tim’s Wine Markets (Orlando, Windermere & Lake Mary) will guide you through the classic Bordeaux and Meritage varietals. Taste each varietal (Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot and Malbec), hear about the unique attributes of each varietal and, then, taste how they all blend together to make a well-balanced, interesting and delicious Meritage red wine blend.

 

“Meritage” Seminar:

 Constellation-Wines-Logo

Luis Torres, Director Education, East Coast/Americas cordially invites you to an event that has rarely been conducted with consumers in the United States:

A master blending of “single barrel, single vintage, single vineyard” examples of the 5 noble Bordeaux varietals. The Orlando Science Center in conjunction with Napa Valley’s Franciscan Wine Estates has arranged for a limited amount of these wines to be flown in for this event. 

During this unique demonstration you will have the opportunity to be the winemaker and learn how the Bordeaux varieties work on their own and as a part of a finished luxury cuvée. At the end of the program your cuveé will be tasted next to Janet Meyer’s (Winemaker at Franciscan) estates Meritage.

We hope you enjoy this presentation on how blending Bordeaux varieties demonstrate that… “The whole is greater than the sum of the parts.”

 

This year, to ensure that guests attending the seminar also have plenty of time to enjoy the Grand Tasting, we have scheduled the seminar as follows:

  • 4:45p.m. Check-in & registration, Founders Room, Level 3.
  • 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. Seminar 
  • 6:00 – 6:15 p.m. Open session for questions
  • Adjourn for Grand Tasting


To register for the Meritage Seminar, you need to have purchased your ticket for Science of Wine or be a confirmed guest of a Science of Wine sponsor. For reservations, please call our Reservations Office at 407.514.2112. A $10 registration fee applies.

Science of Wine Seminar has always been a sell-out event, so be sure to make your plans early!

 

Please note that this event is for guests 21 years of age or older. Valid government issued identification will be required. Please drink responsibly.

  

The great thing about The Science of Wine is that  it's so much more that a wine tasting. We're offering unique, wine-oriented programs to compliment a fantastic evening of wine and food. The following is a list of some of the presenters that will be onhand for the event:

Luis Torres

South American-born, Chicago-raised Luis Torres lends his extensive background in wine supply, distribution, and on-premise roles to the Constellation Academy of Wine. He studied Food Science and Technology in Mexico before spending 15 years in the restaurant industry. His experience includes an apprenticeship at Charlie Trotter’s with Master Sommelier Larry Stone, studies with the Court of Master Sommeliers, and management and wine buying responsibilities for all of Hilton’s Chicago properties.

Steve Butler

Steve is a Certified Wine Educator and Manager of Tim’s Wine Market. He is also an active member of the Society of Wine Educators. Steve Butler will be at The Science of Wine talking about the pros and cons various wine bottle closures, dispelling myths about corks and screwcaps! You’ll find him partnering with Andrea Marzullo at the Guess the Number of Corks station. You won’t want to miss the chance to win a case of Robert Mondavi wine.

Craig Lopus

This Sommelier and Certified Wine Specialist developed his love of wine after living in Europe for seven years. Combined with an MBA in Marketing, Craig’s passions for the corked concoction led him into ownership of Tim’s Wine Market Windermere. Craig is doing what he loves by sharing his love of wine while providing the best selection for any budget in his shops. He is also an active member of the Society of Wine Educators. Craig will be at The Science of Wine utilizing the unique Science on a Sphere to talk about where the outstanding vineyards of the world are located and why their locations make such great wine!

Brian Shields

Inspired by Hurricane Gloria in 1985 to enter the field of meteorology, Brian has always had a passion for the weather. As a Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, Brian brings his enthusiasm to WFTV Channel 9 everyday to give you the local Florida weather forecast. Also look for Brian in a special appearance in the Science Center’s WFTV Channel 9 Severe Weather Center exhibit inside of Our Planet, Our Universe.

Tim Varan

Tim is a Certified Wine Educator and owner of Tim’s Wine Market. Opening the first branch in Orlando in 1995, Tim’s Wine Markets now boasts six locations across Central Florida. Tim brings his 20 years of experience to his business and has the great fortune to taste over 4,000 wines a year to select only the best for his shops, which strive to provide only the best in service, selection and value. Tim will be discussing Wine & Weather with Brian Shields at The Science of Wine.


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Drinking wine is more than simply consuming it, it involves taste. Taste is a reaction that doesn’t require thought but it is very complex. The average person has 5,000 taste buds. Trying to decipher all of types of tastes can be proven difficult. There are many basic taste profiles found in wine. In order to fully taste and appreciate the wine you must learn what those tastes are; with time you will be able to recognize each distinct flavor. The main flavors found in wine are sweet, bitter, tannin, fruit and varietal characteristics, and aftertaste.

The basic taste profiles on the tongue are sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and umami (salt). Sweet flavors can be found on the tip of your tongue. Therefore if there are any sweet elements in the wine that will be the first flavor recognized. Acidity is the term in wine for a sour note. This flavor is found on the sides of your tongue closer to your cheeks. Acidity is more common in lighter-style red wines and white wines. They regularly contain more sour profiles.

Bitterness is found on the back of your tongue. It is very hard to ignore. Mostly this can be found near the end of the taste and can lead to the aftertaste. Tannin can be found in the middle of the tongue. Tannin can be found in either red wines or white wines aged with wood. Tannin is a sensation instead of a flavor. This sensation is why many don’t like red wines. Tannins are an acquired sensation. In white wines, tannin can dry the palate to excess. In red wines, tannins can actually coat your mouth.

Fruit and varietal characteristics are smells. You can tell the body of the wine from the fruit content. This will be found on the middle of your tongue. The aftertaste includes the overall taste and the balance of the flavors and sensations in your mouth. The amount of time the tastes linger can show the quality of the wine. The time the aftertaste can last varies from one to three minutes.

The best way to learn about these flavors is to think while you drink! You will be able to enjoy the wine much more if you realize what you are drinking. The easiest ways to determine what type of wine you prefer is to know the science behind your choice. If you like tannin then you might prefer an oaked chardonnay or a cabernet sauvignon. Knowing all these flavors, sensations, and smells comes with time. The more you drink and think; the more you learn what and why you like each wine.


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Cork is a naturally sustainable product and can only add to the quality of the wine. Cork is both biodegradable and recyclable. The production of cork is different than most harvesting products. In order to harvest cork, the cutting down of trees is not necessary. “Unlike its synthetic counterparts, cork is an inherently sustainable resource, both renewable and biodegradable. The cork oak tree (Quercus suber) is unique in that its thick bark can be stripped off every decade to extract the cork without damaging the trees, which can live 170 to 250 years on average.” (100percentcork.org)

Most winemakers would agree that cork can add to the quality of the wine better than any type of closure. In the Wine Business Monthly 2009 Closure Report, wineries rated closures by perceived consumer acceptance. Natural cork received the highest marks. A more direct study of consumer perception was conducted by the Oregon State University Food Innovation Center. It found that consumers perceived wine finished with cork to have higher quality and price than the same wine finished in alternative closures. (100percentcork.org).

You can learn about all things wine at our first annual Science of Wine event.  If you’re planning a trip to the Science Center before the event, you can guess the amount of corks displayed in the lobby to receive various prizes. Good luck and happy guessing!


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Terroir is the term used to classify everything that happens to the grape naturally. This includes the geographical region, soil, and the weather. Terroir is a French term meaning land and is a major determining factor is the quality of the wine. For some wines to be in best quality, the grapes must be harvested in what most people might say are harsh environments. This is called the “Struggling Vine Theory”. You might think that growing grapes in cold environments or in limestone gravel wouldn’t be ideal but for some grapes this is the best environment.

The location of the vineyard can affect the whole grape production. The soil composition, exposure to sun, and the climate can change the quality of the wine produced. Sometimes even within the same vineyard, depending on the sun position and other factors, a difference can be seen in the grapes produced.

When looking at grape harvesting it is important to keep in mind that there are many factors that go into even the growing of the grapes. If you want to learn about the difference that terroir makes on growing grapes and making wine, sign up for the Appellations Can you Tell the Difference seminar at the Science of Wine on May 14.  Utilizing Google Earth, the participants will visit four California vineyards and taste the wines that come from those vineyards.

Napa


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Smell is our strongest sense and in wine tasting this becomes dominant. The smell can change the whole experience. It is crucial to know what to look for when you smell a good wine and the technique required to do so. Smell is an uncontrollable sense so it is only natural that this can change the taste of anything including wine. Each grape variety has its own distinct smell characteristics. One can also pick up some of the winemakers techniques when they know what they are looking for. For example, if a Chardonnay is fermented using oak chips to add more flavoring, the smell is quite different from a Chardonnay without oak additives.

Smell is something that occurs without training but with a little bit of attention to details one can learn how to master the art of smelling. Before smelling, it is crucial to swirl the glass of wine. This will allow the smells to open up and become more distinct. Try smelling the wine before swirling and try to notice the difference. When you have learned how to smell using these basic techniques you will begin to pick up on the subtle and strong differences between the wine varieties.

Want to see for yourself how much smell effects taste? Try the jelly bean experiment. Take a jelly bean without knowing the color. Plug your nose then put the jelly bean in your mouth. You will be able to tell that it is sweet and know the texture but not much more than that. Then unplug your nose. Did you notice the change in flavor? Now you should be able to tell what flavor the jelly bean is without a doubt. Surprised how much smell goes into the tastes. Now you might see why it is so important to smell the wine before tasting to get the full experience of what you are enjoying.

 

Wine_Glass


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Orlando Science Center • 777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
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