Join us for a unique event at the Orlando Science Center...

  

Heartfelt Thanks

Heartfelt thanks to our Presenting Sponsor, Akerman and our Wine Sponsor, Southern Wine & Spirits as well as all our sponsors, restaurants, education partners, in-kind partners, auction donor, committee members and You, our guests.

It was a tremendous event featuring fine wine, delicious food, interesting educational content and plenty of energy and fun! We’re thrilled to be hearing rave reviews and we hope you enjoyed it as much as we did! See you next year – May 9, 2015!!

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5th Annual Science of Wine

May 9, 2015, 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Join us for a night of wine and gourmet food! The Science of Wine is a unique wine and food tasting with an educational twist. Over 150 of the finest wines from all of the major regions of the world will be represented. Local gourmet restaurants and caterers will also be present to pair the wines with a variety of delectable dishes.

This is a unique event that offers a chance to celebrate and network with others who enjoy the culture of wine. We look forward to seeing you!

 

Planning Committee

Thanks to the commitment, enthusiasm and leadership of the Science of Wine Planning Committee, the Science of Wine has become one of the more popular events in the Science Center’s calendar. If you’d like to network with a hard-working but fun-loving group of professionals like yourself, please contact Kathy Lopus at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .  

 


 

Southern Wine & Spirits

 

 Franciscan Estates Seminar

 

Restaurant Recognition

 

Sincere thanks to all our culinary partners:
Hawker's Asian Street Fare
Orlando World Center Marriott
Publix Aprons
Arthur's Catering
John & Shirley's Catering
John Michael Events
Vital Flair Catering

Talk of the Town, featuring
• Charley's Steak House
• Vito's Chop House
• MoonFish
• FishBones

Johnnie's Hideaway
Blackfin
Shari Sushi

 

Please note that this event is for guests 21 years of age or older. Valid government issued identification will be required. Please drink responsibly.

  

Cork is a naturally sustainable product and can only add to the quality of the wine. Cork is both biodegradable and recyclable. The production of cork is different than most harvesting products. In order to harvest cork, the cutting down of trees is not necessary. “Unlike its synthetic counterparts, cork is an inherently sustainable resource, both renewable and biodegradable. The cork oak tree (Quercus suber) is unique in that its thick bark can be stripped off every decade to extract the cork without damaging the trees, which can live 170 to 250 years on average.” (100percentcork.org)

Most winemakers would agree that cork can add to the quality of the wine better than any type of closure. In the Wine Business Monthly 2009 Closure Report, wineries rated closures by perceived consumer acceptance. Natural cork received the highest marks. A more direct study of consumer perception was conducted by the Oregon State University Food Innovation Center. It found that consumers perceived wine finished with cork to have higher quality and price than the same wine finished in alternative closures. (100percentcork.org).

You can learn about all things wine at our first annual Science of Wine event.  If you’re planning a trip to the Science Center before the event, you can guess the amount of corks displayed in the lobby to receive various prizes. Good luck and happy guessing!


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Terroir is the term used to classify everything that happens to the grape naturally. This includes the geographical region, soil, and the weather. Terroir is a French term meaning land and is a major determining factor is the quality of the wine. For some wines to be in best quality, the grapes must be harvested in what most people might say are harsh environments. This is called the “Struggling Vine Theory”. You might think that growing grapes in cold environments or in limestone gravel wouldn’t be ideal but for some grapes this is the best environment.

The location of the vineyard can affect the whole grape production. The soil composition, exposure to sun, and the climate can change the quality of the wine produced. Sometimes even within the same vineyard, depending on the sun position and other factors, a difference can be seen in the grapes produced.

When looking at grape harvesting it is important to keep in mind that there are many factors that go into even the growing of the grapes. If you want to learn about the difference that terroir makes on growing grapes and making wine, sign up for the Appellations Can you Tell the Difference seminar at the Science of Wine on May 14.  Utilizing Google Earth, the participants will visit four California vineyards and taste the wines that come from those vineyards.

Napa


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Smell is our strongest sense and in wine tasting this becomes dominant. The smell can change the whole experience. It is crucial to know what to look for when you smell a good wine and the technique required to do so. Smell is an uncontrollable sense so it is only natural that this can change the taste of anything including wine. Each grape variety has its own distinct smell characteristics. One can also pick up some of the winemakers techniques when they know what they are looking for. For example, if a Chardonnay is fermented using oak chips to add more flavoring, the smell is quite different from a Chardonnay without oak additives.

Smell is something that occurs without training but with a little bit of attention to details one can learn how to master the art of smelling. Before smelling, it is crucial to swirl the glass of wine. This will allow the smells to open up and become more distinct. Try smelling the wine before swirling and try to notice the difference. When you have learned how to smell using these basic techniques you will begin to pick up on the subtle and strong differences between the wine varieties.

Want to see for yourself how much smell effects taste? Try the jelly bean experiment. Take a jelly bean without knowing the color. Plug your nose then put the jelly bean in your mouth. You will be able to tell that it is sweet and know the texture but not much more than that. Then unplug your nose. Did you notice the change in flavor? Now you should be able to tell what flavor the jelly bean is without a doubt. Surprised how much smell goes into the tastes. Now you might see why it is so important to smell the wine before tasting to get the full experience of what you are enjoying.

 

Wine_Glass


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
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