Giant Screen Films

Now Showing Daily

 

Be transported to exotic lands without ever leaving home, with images of extraordinary clarity and depth that surround the audience using the largest film format in existence. You can journey to the top of Mt. Everest or to the bottom of the ocean through a theater experience that transports you to the center of the action.

Featuring a giant screen measuring 8,000 square feet, the 300-seat Dr. Phillips CineDome projects films through a fisheye lens, creating an image that surrounds the audience and extends well beyond their peripheral vision. Each screening is an invitation for fun and discovery.

We utilize the largest format film in the world. It is commonly called 15/70. This means 15 perforations (horizontally) on a 70 mm print. This format is 10 times larger than a conventional film theater. IWERKS Entertainment in Burbank, California manufactured the projector.

 

Fun Facts

  • The 15kW lamp operates at an internal temperature of up 6,000 degrees F, almost as hot as the sun.
  • The film is so strong that it could pull a car.
  • The film travels 5 ½ feet per second through the projector. 300 feet per minute.
  • The projector runs at about 20 mph at full speed.
  • The film projector weighs 2,300 lbs and goes 23 feet into the air.
  • Large screen film cameras can only shoot for 90 seconds before they run out of film and a fully loaded camera weighs 60 lbs.
  • All of our shows are presented in digital audio.
  • There are 30 individual speakers located in 7 clusters.

 

Jane Goodall was one of three women that the famed anthropologist Louis Leakey sponsored to study primates in the wild.  Raised by missionaries in a Kenyan village, Leaky was fascinated by the connections between man and animal. Leakey made several discoveries in the study of human evolution. He sent Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Birute Galdikas into the wilds of Africa and Indonesia to learn about primates in their natural habitat and gain incite into what our own pre humans ancestors might have been like.

While Goodall studied chimpanzees, Fossey observed gorillas and Galdikas investigated  orangutans - all at a time when field work was seen as a job only for men.  Their discoveries changed the way the world saw not only women but also our closest animal relations.

Leakeys_Angels


Bookmark and Share

Jane Goodall’s observations of tool use in wild chimps led the famous anthropologist Louis Leakey to comment “We must now redefine man, redefine tool, or accept chimpanzees as human!” According National Geographic News “ Scientist have sequenced the genome of the chimpanzee and found that humans are 96 percent similar to the great ape species.” Between discoveries in the lab and observations in the field we are realizing that the gap between what is human and what is ape is not as wide as was commonly thought. So what does it mean to be a Homo sapiens? Check out the chart below based on the Smithsonian Institution’s Human Origins Program for some of the characteristics that separate us from our ape cousins.

 

Trait

What’s the same

What’s different

Walking on two legs

All apes move in a variety of ways sometime even upright.

 

Only humans regularly walk upright

Tools

 

Lots of apes use tools to forage and hut for food

Only humans manufacture such a wide variety of tools for so many varied different purposes.

Social Life

Most apes live in social groups,

And take several years to grow up

Only humans take twice as long to grow up as out closest ape relatives and have a rich and diverse set of social groups.

Language and Symbols

All apes use lots of sounds to communicate

Only humans use complex language that allows us to communicate abstract ideas

 

Click here for more information about human origins visit:

 


Bookmark and Share

777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility