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Ever dream of becoming a super hero? Playing the hero in video games may actually help make that a reality!

Violent video games have long been thought to increase aggression, but it appears that the opposite is true as well. A study done at the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Laboratory shows that having superpowers in a video game can make people more altruistic.

Stanford researchers used a simulation game to test their theory. One at a time, 60 men and women strapped on virtual reality goggles and were whisked away to a virtual cityscape. Their airborne mission: to deliver insulin to a diabetic child. Half of the test subjects completed their mission by flying in a helicopter; the other half controlled their flight by a series of arm motions, like Superman.

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We got moving during this Member Monday outing as parents and their little ones sang children songs, blew bubbles, rolled some balls and played the parachute game!

Thanks to everyone who participated as well as Gymboree of Orlando and Gymboree of Winter Park for their support!




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The Orlando Science Center, in partnership with the Walmart Foundation, provided educational workshops at the 24th annual Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities in Eatonville last weekend, Feb. 1–3.

Students engaged in “Discovery Health: Investigating the Cardiovascular System,” a 60-minute session that introduces physiology and body systems while integrating health science curricula and health care pathways. The workshop was geared toward middle school students and supported the festival’s Education Day.

The Science Center also hosted hands-on activities and health science demonstrations throughout the weekend. Festival-goers explored physiology concepts utilizing Vernier Probeware, learned how to measure heart rate, analyzed the effects of physical activity on the heart, discovered the function of muscles and even performed a real chicken heart dissection!

Check out the photos below!




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Take a trip down memory lane to the last time you played with Legos. Believe it or not, these childhood building blocks weren’t only fun—they actually helped develop your aptitude for math and science!

That’s right—besides building space cruisers, helicopters and pirate ships, Legos are also building the next generation of engineers. They allow children to use their imaginations, plus every Lego project also teaches basic engineering and design principles! Building with these little plastic blocks helps kids develop spatial reasoning and learn about structural integrity, design and a practical sense of geometry.

engineer-it legos

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Thinking back to high school geometry, did you ever think you might calculate the hypotenuse of a triangle in your adult life? Or apply the principles of acceleration learned in physics class?

For aviators, understanding math and physics is a must for reviewing flight plans and calculating fuel usage. Students, however, often don't see a correlation between math and science and their life experiences. Like generations before, they find themselves questioning when they will ever use the lessons taught in school.

What kids do understand is technology. 

When it comes to technology in education, there is an enormous amount of evidence that indicates immersive, game-based learning environments foster deeper learning and provide opportunities to develop and exercise collaborative skills.

It’s all a matter of harnessing gaming power for an academic purpose. Lockheed Martin is working to combine technology and learning for professionals and students through its Prepar3D® simulation software. It’s one conduit to help engage students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) studies.

Lockheed-Martin-Prepar3D

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We got messy during January's Member Monday!

The youngins played with spaghetti noodles, painted with balloons and crafted works of art with playfoam.

Go through our slideshow and see the fun that was had by our member families!

 


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Experience The Polar Express 3D in new Digital Adventure Theater, Build Your Own Gingerbread House, Enroll Kids in Winter Break Camps and Enjoy Live Musical Performances

Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012 - Sunday, Jan. 6, 2013

ORLANDO, Fla. (Dec. 20, 2012) – Kids are out of school and families are home for the holidays; what better gift than to partake in festive activities at Orlando Science Center? From Dec. 19 to Jan. 6, the Science Center has just what the family needs to get in the yuletide spirit with showings of The Polar Express 3D in the new Digital Adventure Theater, build-your-own gingerbread house workshops, winter break camps and performances by handbell ensembles.

IP PolarExpress3D

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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER, A FLORIDA-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH2342), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.