Exhibit Hall

Now Open on Level 2

A visitor favorite, Science Park’s eclectic array of interactive exhibits lets you explore such concepts as lights & lasers, sound & waves, electricity & magnetism, fundamental forces, and simulation. Make "waves" at the giant 56 foot echo tube or tap out a tune on pipes of pan.

Race your friends on the 70ft pinewood derby track or take to the air on our flight simulator. Discover the power of light, and make your own mini-laser show. There are also new open-ended exhibits that invite visitors to imagine, create, and construct various inventions from paper flying machines to structures from PVC pipe.

Science Park also features a variety of live shows and demonstrations that complement and enhance the topics in the exhibit. We’re always creating new exhibits for Science Park, so check our website articles for news.

 

Supplies you will need

  • Water
  • 1 clear plastic bottle
  • Vegetable oil
  • Food coloring
  • Alka-Seltzer or any sort of tables that fizz

Directions

  1. Fill the clear plastic bottle one quarter of the way full with water
  2. Fill the bottle with vegetable oil until it is nearly full
  3. Wait for the oil and the water to separate
  4. Add about twelve drops of your favorite color food coloring into the bottle
  5. The food coloring will fall through the oil, drop to the bottom and mix with the water
  6. Break the Alka-Seltzer tablet into four small pieces
  7. Add the first piece of Alka-Seltzer to the water and watch the lava begin!
  8. Once the bubbling stops add more Alka-Seltzer to continue to fun

Lava_Lamo

The science behind the experiment

The oil and water separate because the density of each liquid is different. The oil floats to the top because it has a lower density than water and food coloring do.

The Alka-Seltzer tablets that are dropped in the bottle release small bubbles of carbon dioxide. The bubbles then rise to the top with the water and food coloring.  Once the gas escapes, the water goes back to the bottom.


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Would you ever expect to see a robotics demonstration at the NBA All-Star Jam Fest? That's exactly what we saw when we ran into First Robotics Club 233. In this video, Kaitlin Lostroscio from Pink Team FRC 233 gave us a tour of the basketball playing robot they created. Great job Pink Team!


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Shocking test have made physicists question Albert Einstein’s cardinal rule of physics: nothing is faster than the speed of light. At the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), OPERA, a team of physicists, shot neutrinos out of a particle accelerator and measured how long it took the particles to travel to a neutrino detector. Neutrinos are subatomic particles that have very little mass and can zoom through planets like they were not even there.

It was expected that these particles would be close in speed to light. However, their speed was 60 nanoseconds faster than expected, surprising many scientists. Although a nanosecond seems very small, over a distance of 621 miles, neutrinos would travel about 66 feet farther than light travels in the same time. If this discovery is accurate, it would be “revolutionary”, according to physicist Stephen Parke, because most theorists believe nothing can travel faster than the speed of light.

A number of physicists have been skeptical about this finding because it would wreak havoc on scientific theories of cause and effect. Speculation looms that there might be instrument errors among the OPERA team causing these findings to be inaccurate. Louis Striggari, an astrophysicist at Stanford University, said, "There have been several instances where, through no fault of the experimenters, the equipment was not understood as well as it needed to be."

Even the OPERA team is being cautious about their findings allowing others to repeat the experiment. However, over the past month, many different physicists have had trouble repeating the experiment. There have been no concrete findings yet and physicists will continue experimenting with neutrinos.

Neutrino


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As Atlantis landed at the Kennedy Space Station this morning, many Orlando locals were able to hear the loud sonic boom as the shuttle re-entered Earth’s atmosphere. The shuttle’s twin sonic booms - caused by shock waves at its nose and tail - are a result of the orbiter traveling faster than the speed of sound. Below is a diagram explaining how sonic booms occur and where they were heard:

ShuttleSonicBoom

 

The following YouTube clip is a recording of the Sonic Boom heard in Naples, FL.


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Humans hear millions of sounds everyday. For many people, an alarm clock begins the morning. A trickling coffee pot may filter a hot cup of Joe. And as you start your car, the engine roars as you drive to work or school. Some sounds are pleasant, like birds singing in the trees. But there are plenty of other sounds that drive people crazy. What sound makes people cringe the most? According to an article in Time Magazine this week, whining is one of the most bothering sounds ever.

Researchers for the Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology had participants do math problems as various sounds were played in the background. Levels of concentration varied as they heard silence, talking, “motherese” (aka baby talk), whining and a high-pitched table saw. To make sure participants weren’t distracted by the words themselves, the researchers played foreign language recordings. In the end, whining affected participant’s productivity on their subtraction equations more than the other sounds. According to the study’s co-author and professor of psychology at SUNY New Paltz, Rosemarie Sokol Chang, people of both sexes did fewer problems and did those worse when they heard the whines. Scientists tend to pay more attention to the effect of the other three sounds on humans, so Chang hopes this study will result in further research on whining.


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility

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