Exhibits

 

Orlando Science Center's exhibit halls feature a vast array of exciting interactive experiences! Learning has never been so fun with these hands on educational exhibits. From down to earth explorations in natural science to the high-tech world of simulation technology, everywhere you look, you'll find educational and entertaining opportunities to explore, experiment, and discover.

 

Traveling Exhibits

The Orlando Science Center is home to some of the most exciting traveling exhibits in the country. When these exhibits are in town they are only here for a limited time, so don’t miss the opportunity to see them!

 

Exhibit Halls

As great as our traveling exhibits are, there are some exhibits that are the staple of the Orlando Science Center. NatureWorks will have you up close and personal with some of nature’s most fascinating reptiles. At DinoDigs, you’ll step back into the prehistoric age. Discover the dynamic forces and systems that shape our Earth, as well as other planets in Our Planet, Our Universe. Explore such concepts as electricity and magnetism, lasers, soundwaves, and nature’s forces in Science Park. No visit to the Science Center is complete without a trip to KidsTown, an interactive world dedicated to our smaller explorers.

 

Science Live! Programs

What’s the difference between a great visit to a Science Center and a memorable visit? Live programs. Our exhibits are designed to inspire curiosity and exploration, our Science Live! programs are designed to bring the exhibits to life. Whether it’s a show in the Digital Adventure Theater or a one-to-one interaction with a volunteer at the Crosby Observatory, our live programs create the kind of impact that can last a lifetime.

 

Science Stations

Looking for little more “hard science” in your next Science Center visit? Look no further than the Science Stations located throughout the facility. Science Stations are a cross between exhibits and live programs in that they’re exhibits that typically include a live program to truly bring the experience to life. Science Stations provide an in-depth look at their respective subject matter in an entertaining way. Be sure to check your program schedule to see which Science Stations are conducting demonstrations on the day of your next visit.

 

Crosby Observatory

The aluminum-domed Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Science Center houses Florida's largest publicly accessible refractor telescope. This one-of-a-kind custom-built telescope, along with several smaller scopes, are available at selected times for solar and night sky viewing.

 

Some people are lucky enough to experience all four levels of Orlando Science Center. If you’re Maker Doug Rhodehamel, you’re lucky enough to have your art displayed on all four levels.

Our resident artist began working at the Science Center as a contractor in 2008, and has been gracing the building with his artwork since 2010. Each of Doug’s works incorporates his passion for nature and talent for recycled mediums.

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There’s a new addition to Orlando Science Center’s KidsTown exhibit hall!

Imagination Playground, an innovative playspace concept by Rockwell Group, is a portable playground made of lightweight foam pieces. Loose parts of unique shapes and sizes foster creativity and design, allowing children to build anything they might imagine. Children of all ages can enjoy creating countless settings and scenarios, animals, robots and more with the kid-friendly, eco-friendly foam.

Through Imagination Playground, deep learning concepts such as critical thinking and problem solving are developed and strengthened. Little ones have fun while also "building" on skills that will give them a competitive advantage in school and one day, a career. As your child imagines, designs and creates, they develop an understanding of balance and other STEM concepts.

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All of these pictures were taken using a microscope camera in Dr. Dare's Lab at Orlando Science Center. They are from a drop of pond water taken from Lake Estelle located next door. Take a look through our photo reel to see some awesome microscopic creatures!

The creature boxed in yellow is an example of an ostracod and is commonly known as a Seed Shrimp. Its body is protected by 2 half shells which meet at a hinge toward the top of its body. We found a mosquito in the 2nd stage of its life; eventually it will change and enter pupa stage of its development where it will then transform into an adult mosquito.

The nauphilus copepod has small antennae on its head that are used for swimming. The nauphilus stage is the first stage of development for crustaceans. What do you think it will look like when it grows up? We also found some nematodes, also known as roundworms. To-date over 28,000 different kinds of nematodes have been identified but scientist estimated there could be over 1 million different species.

The video features an ostracod that is first seen searching for food. Unexpectedly an adult copepod enters the frame and the ostracod appears to maneuver plants & algae around its self. See for yourself! Is it trying to hide?

 


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Andrea Hart, Exhibit Developer at Orlando Science Center, and Dan Dunmire, Director at the Corrosion Policy & Oversight Office of the U.S. Department of Defense, give us an inside look at Corrosion: The Silent Menace, currently on display at the Science Center.




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NASA scientists have broken the record for the smallest planet beyond our solar system! The newly-found planet, Kepler 37b, is rocky and only slightly larger than our moon at a mere 3865 kilometers in diameter. It is hellishly hot—it’s so close to its host star that it has a 13-day orbit. This planet may be tiny, but it’s making a big splash in the realms of science!

 

1382364 galaxy landscape

 

Kepler 37b’s host star, Kepler 37, is one of about 150,000 stars being watched by the space-based Kepler Observatory every minute of every day. The mission was launched in 2009 to look for Earth-sized planets positioned in “habitable zones” where liquid water, believed to be necessary for life, can exist on their surfaces. In the beginning, the Kepler team could only find large planets similar in size to Jupiter and Neptune. However, the recent success in finding small planets like Kepler 37b is indicative of amazing technological achievements.

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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
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