Giant Screen Films

Now Showing Daily

 

Be transported to exotic lands without ever leaving home, with images of extraordinary clarity and depth that surround the audience using the largest film format in existence. You can journey to the top of Mt. Everest or to the bottom of the ocean through a theater experience that transports you to the center of the action.

Featuring a giant screen measuring 8,000 square feet, the 300-seat Dr. Phillips CineDome projects films through a fisheye lens, creating an image that surrounds the audience and extends well beyond their peripheral vision. Each screening is an invitation for fun and discovery.

We utilize the largest format film in the world. It is commonly called 15/70. This means 15 perforations (horizontally) on a 70 mm print. This format is 10 times larger than a conventional film theater. IWERKS Entertainment in Burbank, California manufactured the projector.

 

Fun Facts

  • The 15kW lamp operates at an internal temperature of up 6,000 degrees F, almost as hot as the sun.
  • The film is so strong that it could pull a car.
  • The film travels 5 ½ feet per second through the projector. 300 feet per minute.
  • The projector runs at about 20 mph at full speed.
  • The film projector weighs 2,300 lbs and goes 23 feet into the air.
  • Large screen film cameras can only shoot for 90 seconds before they run out of film and a fully loaded camera weighs 60 lbs.
  • All of our shows are presented in digital audio.
  • There are 30 individual speakers located in 7 clusters.

 

Florence, Fernand, or Fiona? What determines the name of the latest Atlantic tropical storm?


During World War II, meteorologists started the trend when they began using female names to identify storms. This was a lot simpler than distinguishing by longitude and latitude, especially when more than one storm occurred at the same time. A few years later, the National Hurricane Center created six lists of women’s names from A to W; male names were added in 1979 to alternate with the female names (ex. Alex, Bonnie, Charley).  Some hurricane names have been retired because of their severeness and replaced with other names of the same gender and beginning letter. To see if your name will be used or has been used for a storm, click here. Also, be sure to check out the latest giant screen film playing at the CineDome, Forces of Nature, featuring the biggest, baddest earthquakes, volcanoes, and storms.

 

Hurricane

Photo courtesy of NASA.


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Starting Friday, October 1 and running to Sunday, December 19, the Orlando Science Center will show Ultimate Wave: Tahiti on Fridays and Sundays at 4 p.m. and Sharks on Saturday at 4 p.m. for only $10. This ticket will allow guests access to only the film, exhibits and science demonstrations are not included, and will be available for purchase after 3:30 p.m. on those days.

Don’t have time to commit to a full day of exhibit exploration, then come just for a film! Directed by Stephen Low, one of the industry’s foremost filmmakers, The Ultimate Wave Tahiti follows world champion surfer Kelly Slater’s quest to find the perfect wave.  Taking viewers on a journey to the scenic beaches of Tahiti, the film simultaneously exemplifies the contrasting concepts of surfing as a competitive sport and an ancient Polynesian wave-riding art.

With The Ultimate Wave Tahiti, Low’s filmmaking uses leading science expertise and the hands-on surf expertise of Kelly Slater to interpret related ocean science and serve a broader, multi-generational audience. Together with science and education elements developed in consultation with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists and educators, this film is geared to making a big splash with adventure-seeking giant screen audiences. See this film on Fridays and Sundays at 4 p.m.

Presented by Jean-Michel Cousteau, SHARKS is a breathtaking new IMAX theatre film experience that offers audiences an astonishing up-close encounter with the Lions and Tigers of the Ocean. Come face-to-face with a multitude of shark species, including the Great White, Hammerhead, and Whale Shark. Witness sharks as they really are: not wicked man-eating creatures, but wild, fascinating and endangered animals that have been in existence since a million years before dinosaurs roamed the earth. See this film on Saturdays at 4 p.m.


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility