Until recently, the eastern diamondback rattlesnake used to be one of the most common snakes that could be found in the Central Florida area just hanging out in your backyard or residing near a body of water. The diamondback populates the woodlands and costal habitats from southern North Carolina to Florida; however, their presence continues to diminish as time goes on.  Due to indiscriminate killing, hunting and widespread loss of habitat, the number of diamondbacks has been steadily declining.

The eastern diamondback is not endangered, however. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced earlier this summer a 90-day finding for a petition to list the eastern diamondback rattlesnake as a threatened species. The organization is currently researching and reviewing the status of the species to determine if the threatened species classification is warranted under the Endangered Species Act.

The Fish and Wildlife Service has taken action by reaching out to state and federal natural resource agencies for information regarding the eastern diamondback and its habitat.  A number of different parties have come together to help address this issue, as one of Florida’s well-known habitants slowly disappears.   Once the review is complete, the listing of the eastern diamondback as an endangered species will either be: warranted; warranted, but precluded by other higher priority activities; or not warranted at all.

easterndiamondback


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