What's New

Kelly Slater is one of the few names from the tight-knit surfing community to reach beyond the ears of the hardcore surfing fan. The Florida grown surfer is known to the world for his unsurpassed nine world championships, laid-back attitude and rugged good looks. But what many don’t know is that Slater’s biggest impact comes from saving the waves, rather than conquering them.

Through The Kelly Slater Foundation, Slater is one of the worlds leading advocates in ocean protection and ecological and scientific understanding. His devotion has always been to the ocean, and his influence attracts those sharing a concern for the ocean’s ecosystems.

Slater’s admiration for the science behind the waves is no more apparent than in his starring role in the film Ultimate Wave: Tahiti, showing at the Orlando Science Center. With the help of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration the film demonstrates how communities and people far from the ocean shore are affected by the ocean’s interplay within our ecosystem. Slater’s hands-on wave experience, coupled with the NOAA’s scientific insight provides a unique way for everybody to get on board and save the waves.

Ultimate Wave: Tahiti premieres at Cocktails & Cosmos, Saturday June 19.


Bookmark and Share

It’s a great time for paleontology. I know, I’m the first guy to say “It’s always a great time for paleontology” but believe me, this time, it’s a great time for Paleontology!

In the last few weeks, we’ve made incredible leaps and bounds in our understanding of the natural world. Scientists in Canada, Australia, and Japan successfully cloned blood protein from a Siberian Wooly Mammoth, bringing us one step closer to successfully cloning an extinct animal (The Pyrenean Ibex, an extinct goat, was cloned in 2009, but did not survive.) Scientists are optimistic, some predicting oogenesis (living embryos) in the next two years, and giant fuzzy elephants in zoos in less than five years!

This article is really about Snuffy and Big Bird, if you think about it.

I know, right? But sit down, there’s more.

Read more...


Bookmark and Share

STAN the T. rex is a truly spectacular display that you can only see in DinoDigs... Or Indianapolis... Or London... Or California... Or Arizona... Or Japan.

What gives? How can the same dinosaur be in so many places at once?

(Originally posted June 6, 2009) - Dinosaur fossils are fragile pieces of the puzzle of Earth's history. When we do find them (and it is tough - even if you know where to look) they are often broken up or missing pieces. Even STAN was missing about 30% of his skeleton when he was discovered. How do scientists bring them back for us to view in museums around the world?

We make copies! (or Casts, as we call them!) It's okay, because if scientists didn't do that, the whole world would only have about 3 or 4 complete T. rex skeletons altogether (and a ton of spare parts!)

Read more...


Bookmark and Share

Here's a fun activity courtesy of NOAA and the folks at Ultimate Wave: Tahiti.  Don't forget, the film premieres here on June 19!

 



Bookmark and Share

This is a fun activity courtesy of the people from Ultimate Wave Tahiti, coming to the Dr. Phillips CineDome on June 19.

You will need:
  • A clear plastic bottle, about 20 oz (600 ml) size or smaller
  • Rubbing alcohol, enough to fill the bottle half-way
  • Mineral spirits, enough to fill the bottle half-way
  • Food coloring, a few drops; you choose the color

 

Directions

Do these steps in a sink with help from an adult:

  1. Fill the bottle half-way with rubbing alcohol.
  2. Add three or four drops of food coloring to the alcohol and shake to mix.
  3. Add mineral spirits to fill the bottle and put the top onto the bottle. Be sure the top is tight!
  4. Hold bottle horizontally until the layers separate, then raise and lower one end to create waves.

For more information about different types of waves and wave features, visit www.ultimatewavetahiti.com/explore.


Bookmark and Share

We're serious about our Science, but that doesn't mean we can't have a few laughs, too! On May 2nd, crowds were treated to three Standing-Room-Only performances by Willie the Clown AKA The Science Magician! Our happy harlequin host presented several magic tricks, including several that still have us scratching our heads!  But best of all, in true Science Center fashion, there was something to learn, too.   

Willie's Clues about Refraction opened guests eyes to a glass-shattering illusion, while Willie's Clues about Pressure made for a fun and confounding round of "Three Card Monte!"   

In a related note, nuclear physicist and OSC Volunteer Bill Kahn has performed his unique brand of theatrical Clownology for years, delighting audiences at various shelters, hospitals, and assisted living facilities. Mr. Kahn, who represents Willie in all of his business dealings and recommendations for pizza toppings, has hinted that in the very near future, the lovable Science Magician may pop up again!

 


Bookmark and Share

777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: [email protected]
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility