Science Station

Scheduled Times on Level 4

Create your own discovery at Dr. Dare’s Lab where we have hundreds of experiments that cover all types of sciences! Discover on our advanced equipment the properties of light, the serge of electricity and many diverse chemical reactions! At Dr. Dare’s Lab you can even draw out your own DNA!

The labs are held in the afternoon on Saturdays and Sundays and are great for all ages! The possibilities are endless as you play scientist in this innovative lab, and perform hands-on experiments under the guidance of a trained instructor (check daily schedule for availability).

 

All of these pictures were taken using a microscope camera in Dr. Dare's Lab at Orlando Science Center. They are from a drop of pond water taken from Lake Estelle located next door. Take a look through our photo reel to see some awesome microscopic creatures!

The creature boxed in yellow is an example of an ostracod and is commonly known as a Seed Shrimp. Its body is protected by 2 half shells which meet at a hinge toward the top of its body. We found a mosquito in the 2nd stage of its life; eventually it will change and enter pupa stage of its development where it will then transform into an adult mosquito.

The nauphilus copepod has small antennae on its head that are used for swimming. The nauphilus stage is the first stage of development for crustaceans. What do you think it will look like when it grows up? We also found some nematodes, also known as roundworms. To-date over 28,000 different kinds of nematodes have been identified but scientist estimated there could be over 1 million different species.

The video features an ostracod that is first seen searching for food. Unexpectedly an adult copepod enters the frame and the ostracod appears to maneuver plants & algae around its self. See for yourself! Is it trying to hide?

 


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Today is Valentine’s Day, a day of conversation hearts, heart-felt cards and carnations. But have you ever stopped to consider the reasons we feel attraction and fall in love?

Although shared interests and compatible personalities may set you and a partner up for a great first date, that coveted “spark” of attraction may be a result of biochemistry. Researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland believe that initial attraction comes down to pheromones.

lovecouple-web

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Do you believe that beauty is in the eye of the beholder? Many of us have the idea that a person’s attractiveness is purely subjective or that human beauty is up for interpretation.

Believe it or not, these ideas are fairly outdated—by 2,400 years! There is actually hard science behind what we perceive as attractive.

Pythagoras was the first to consider the math behind what humans consider “beautiful.” He came up with the idea of Phi, an irrational number from which he derived the Golden Ratio. This ratio, 1:1.618, is believed to be the most aesthetically pleasing to the human eye.

2013-02-13

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In the 1950's Stanley Miller was experimenting with what might have caused inorganic compounds to tease themselves together into the amino acids and proteins needed to spark life on a new and uninhabited Earth billions of years ago.

Miller created samples of ‘primordial soup’ and tested them for the ingredients needed to create small, uncomplicated, single-celled organisms. Some of his samples got shelved as unproductive - these are the samples being revisited in this study. And it turns out Miller accomplished a lot more than he thought.

More details at: www.sciencedaily.com.

Stephanie is a Science Interpreter at the Science Center and often is found in DinoDigs or Careers for Life. Paleontology, Anthropology and Anatomy are her passion and jumps at every opportunity to talk about it. Stop in and say Hello!


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The periodic table contains the 118 unique elements that are currently known to exist on the planet. You can find it proudly displayed in most high school chemistry classes and it is a tool that teachers encourage their students to use on tests. In his book, The Disappearing Spoon, Sam Kean examines each individual element that makes up the periodic table by revealing their unique stories and origins. Here are just a few elements that are pretty awesome:

  • Hydrogen (H) is one of the main elements that make up stars (and because it is highly reactive, we use it in balloons for KaBoom shows).
  • “Self-sterilizing” Copper (Cu) tubing is used in air-conditioning ducts because copper will disrupt the metabolism of certain bacteria and fungi.
  • Gallium (Ga) has a melting point of 84°F, which makes it one of the few metals that can melt in the palm of one’s hand. A popular practical joke among scientists was to take a Gallium spoon and give it to a colleague with a hot cup of tea, only to have it disappear.

Visit this link for additional information about The Disappearing Spoon.

If you love chemistry and want to experience some hands-on experiments, stop by Dr. Dare’s Laboratory on your next visit to the science center.


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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
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